What is it? Set 136

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794. Some sort of recording phonograph. I'm guessing a form of dictaphone. 796. phone jack. Karl
R.H. wrote:
Reply to
kfvorwerk
793. A scraper of some kind. Offset handle for working at floor level methinks. 794. A dictaphone, or other type of recorder. 795. ??? 796. RJ-11 modular connector
Reply to
Bahremu
793. A scraper of some kind. Offset handle for working at floor level methinks. 794. A dictaphone, or other type of recorder. 795. ??? 796. RJ-11 modular connector
Reply to
Bahremu
793. I'm guessing it's used to get the accurate and uniform spacing for putting up wood siding/clapboard.
Reply to
efgh
#793 Stanley Clapboard Gauge. Used to space clapboards. #794 Edison voicewriter. Just saw one on mythbusters yesterday. 30's dictaphone. #795 A latch of some type? #796 RJ11 jack
Reply to
Scott Lurndal
A guess for 795. You put it into something, turn the screw to push the lugs out, and then pull it to remove the thing you've pushed it into from some other thing into which it fits snuggly.
Hmm, having written that it's not much of a guess.
Reply to
Nick Atty
797: Barrel wrench for opening the several different bung's and lids. 798: A pipe knife for your smoking pleasure. Puff
Reply to
Puff Griffis
According to R.H. :
As usual -- posting from rec.crafts.metalworking.
793) Perhaps for cutting or scoring a groove in the edge of something wooden?
A closer look at both ends of the blade clamped in it might help somewhat.
794) A *very* old office dictation machine. It looks as though it uses something like Edison cylinders.
795) This looks as though its function is to slide in a square tubing, and then to be locked at a certain extension. Perhaps it is to be an extendible leg on some furniture?
796) A "modular phone plug" model RJ-11. (RJ-13 is the six-conductor one, and RJ-45 is the eight conductor one, which is used for twisted pair ethernet among other things.
A somewhat narrower version is used for handset cords for phones of a certain age.
797) It looks as though it is intended to pull chain links together, perhaps to allow a "repair" link to be installed. And, at a guess, the two notches in the faces of the flat jaws are to close an opened link once it is in place.
798) The end of the pocket knife looks as though it is is intended to smooth a surface by rocking back and forth in contact with it.
Perhaps for burnishing paper which has been erased by scraping off the ink? In that case, the blades might be to cut a new point in a quill pen?
Now to see what others have said.
When can you safely go back to the Roman numerals? They make this thread easier to find -- but obviously you don't want them classified as porn spam, which I believe was the reason to abandon temporarily the Roman numerals in the first place.
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Actually, the "RJ" numbers are wiring patterns for specific applications, not the connectors. They are named *p*c, for the number of postions and the number of conductors.
That is the 4P4C wired as a four conductor handset cord. The one in picture 796 is the 4P4C, as used for handsets.
is a link to some common RJ numbers.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
Correct answers so far:
793. Stanley clapboard gauge
794. Ediphone dictation machine
795. Not sure about this tool yet
796. Telephone plug
797. One of the functions of this multi-tool is a can opener, but I don't know if the wrench is for a specific purpose. I haven't had time to search the patent date.
797. Also don't know about the pocket knife.
I'm going to be away from my computer until sometime on Saturday, I'll post the answer page tomorrow night.
Rob
Reply to
R.H.
Hi Rob,
I'll save you the trouble, it is patent number 286,458. "Combination Tool: for houshold use".
Claims:
Vise Nutcracker Wrench Pliers Tack puller Pruner Wire cutter Can opener
Link:
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I had to look it up, so I didn't think it was all that fair to post an answer right away.
I'll see if I can put something together about searching via classes sometime soon (per the other thread/question). It takes some work and learning and isn't for the impatient or faint-of-heart :)
Reply to
Leon Fisk
Hi Rob,
I think I found this, January 25 1916, patent number 1,169,533.
"Device for applying pressure: Particularly adapted for use in quoins for use in locking forms of type in chases."
See:
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Thanks to "795 - looks like a chase lock for a printing press; by Mark, at 10/13/2006 1:42 PM" on the Blog comments page for the clue I needed to find this.
I guess the more technical term for this is a "Quoin", which means:
1 a: a solid exterior angle (as of a building) b: one of the members (as a block) forming a quoin and usually differentiated from the adjoining walls by material, texture, color, size, or projection
2: the keystone or a voussoir of an arch
3: a wooden or expandable metal block used by printers to lock up a form within a chase
This wasn't a word I was familiar with, but the third meaning from Merriam-Webster seems to fit well.
Reply to
Leon Fisk
794: is a "record" recorder. It was used to create I believe 78 rpm albums. These were quite the rage.
796: in its current configuration thats a "line cord" for a RJ-14 or RJ-25 jack. Better known as a telephone cord. Because it does NOT have only 2 wires it would not typically be used with an RJ-11 jack, though it could be. IF you only were interested in the "1st line" The wiring is inside to out. Meaning the inner two wires would be line 1 ( Red/green ) and the outer two would be "line 2" (yellow/black.). ORINGALLY yellow was a power line for the lighting circuitry on the "princess" style phones with the black providing the ground as the "dialtone" on a landline phone is -48vdc.
798: has all the "looks" of a barlow knife. The rounded hammer head suggests a shaping usage.
Troy
R.H. wrote:
Reply to
Troy
Hmm ... the phone company (the originator of these, IIRC) uses RJ-48 for both of the wiring patterns on the identical connector for a feed from a T1 box on the side of the house to the DSU in the house. The only difference is the suffix which indicates the differing wiring pattern for the transmit and receive pairs. The one which I am using is RJ-48C. I forget what the other one was.
However -- the 8-pin connector involved is usually referred to as a RJ-45
I don't believe so. The one shown has the fatter side walls, producing a connector the same width as the 6-pin version. You can see the grooves which would accept the extra blades (and in this case, simply prevent damage to the wire pins in a 6-conductor jack).
The 4-pin used in the handsets (at least in the old ITT one in my hand at the moment) is narrower, and does not have the unused grooves outside the four in actual use.
But -- it does not show the RJ-13, and a Google search for that seems to be confused by someone who has been posting under the name "rj13".
Enjoy, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
795: Looks to me like this is a set of quoins used to tighten moveable printing type in a chase to keep the type from falling out while in the printing press.
Reply to
Charlie
Hi, all
I've been lurking here for a bit, but haven't posted before. I don't know what 795 is, but I'm pretty sure they aren't printers quoins. I can't pretend to be a world-class expert on quoins, but I did spend three years working with old printing equipment at a historic restoration on Staten Island, and I've never seen this style of quoin before. Furthermore, they don't look to be well adapted for the purpose. First of all, quoins have to generate a _lot_ of force. The form is almost an inch thick of solid lead and is held in place entirely by the friction resulting from the force that the quoins exert at the edges. All the quoins I've ever seen are wedges with vertex angles on the order of ten degrees. This device seems to have vertex angles more like eighty degrees, meaning it's designed to quickly take up a relatively large amount of slack, but generates relatively little force. Second, this device appears to be designed to exert force between two surfaces that are significantly out of parallel. That wouldn't be an issue in a printing form. Third, with the actuating screw on the end like that, the device would be rather awkward to tighten in a chase. The quoins I've used have either been actuated by a key inserted from the top (the side, in the photo), or are driven in place with a mallet and "shooting stick."
I'm not 100% sure, but that isn't how I'd make a set of quoins if I were designing them.
--Dan
Reply to
Dan

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