Wood splitter help

My dad acquired a wood splitter project at auction from my deceased grandfa
ther's estate. It was incomplete. He added an engine and had it painted. It
will cycle the ram to the piece of wood then stop. The pump on it my grand
father installed was a Vickers vane pump but no other markings on it other
than several paten numbers.
I am assuming the pump is too small. I wanted to know what you guys think.
Here is a picture:
formatting link

Reply to
stryped
Loading thread data ...
My dad acquired a wood splitter project at auction from my deceased grandfather's estate. It was incomplete. He added an engine and had it painted. It will cycle the ram to the piece of wood then stop. The pump on it my grandfather installed was a Vickers vane pump but no other markings on it other than several paten numbers.
I am assuming the pump is too small. I wanted to know what you guys think. Here is a picture:
formatting link

==================
The critical parts specific to a log splitter are a two-speed gear pump and a control valve that latches in position for reverse but NOT forward.
formatting link

The two-speed pump automatically downshifts to 1/4 the flow rate when the cylinder pressure reaches ~600 PSI, so it retracts and advances quickly under light loads and doesn't stall the motor during a difficult split. The relief valve may be part of the control valve assembly. The pressure gauge is optional, and a weak point due to the vibration. If you want one it should be snubbed and filled with glycerin or the needle will vibrate into an unreadable blur.
Mine which was assembled by someone else from Northern Tool components has a 5.5 HP engine, an L095 Lovejoy coupler, an 11 GPM pump and a 3-1/2" cylinder, which all work well together. I recently discovered that the engine mounting plate had warped from welding and was distorting the engine crankcase. It's flat within a few thousandths now, thanks to an afternoon of grinding and filing.
formatting link

The plastic pump bracket #3030-1751 has enough give that the bolts loosen, so I drilled and safety-wired them. It fits a 5.5HP Tecumseh and the 6.5 HP Predator from HF. The advantage of a direct mount on the engine is no side loading on the pump shaft bearings.
I can't tell if there is a strainer screen between the reservoir and the pump inlet. I made an in-line housing for one from a 1-1/2" pipe tee. The third opening is the drain plug.
--jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
formatting link
"You didn't say what pump you're using, but if it's a 2-stage pump they are not designed for side loading at all. 2-stage pumps are designed for low torque, high speed drives, shaft-to-shaft with the engine. They use very small shafts and some of those have a snap ring groove inside the pump, which is where they break. Then you buy a new pump. Many larger pumps have an outboard bearing to support the shaft and they can be pulley driven. But I think the smallest ones use 3/4" shafts."
Reply to
Jim Wilkins

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.