Zennis (and the saga continues)

Took the bunch of Zenni glasses to independant optician. He put them all on
the "gadget" and find out that most of the Zennis correction were exactly as
requested. One had the wrong astigmatism correction.
Now, I'm thinking that the independant optician doctor lady at Walmart wrote
down the wrong numbers. Or, did the test wrong. From what I can figure, my
eyes need stronger correction, and she wrote down weaker correction than
what I had before.
I'm going to call the store, and ask for a recheck. And when it warms up a
bit, the economy picks up. I may also be going to the more honest optical
doctor, and get another eye exam.
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
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Reply to
Stormin Mormon
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I am not an optometrist, but I am an optical engineer. I am nearsighted with a little astigmatism. One thing I have noticed a lot of optomtrists are sloppy about is positioning the gadget that holds all the trial lenses. If it is tilted or not centered very carefully to your eyes, it can significantly affect the astigmatism reading. This is especially true if you have strong myopia. You know it is not positioned right if you find you are looking at the chart through the top or bottom of the trial lenses. Also if the trail lenses are not close enough to your eyes, they will have a lesser effect, and the prescription will end up being too strong. I have a suspiscion that some optometrists may reduce the prescription power slightly to compensate for this effect.
Reply to
anorton
And that is why I'm waiting (any minute now) for UPS to deliver my set of trial lenses. From now on, I'll have no one to blame but myself for a bad prescription.
Last trip to the Opthalmologist, my wife asked the Dr. to write down her PD on the prescription. He said that the optician (in his lobby) would do it. Well, she did, but it wasn't without a whole lot of attitude. And now I'm wondering why the Drl. wouldn't just write it on the scrip form? He had to know the measurement, otherwise how could he properly locate the trial lenses?
Whem exactly, did they make it legal for doctor's offices to sell glasses? I know it's under a different business name, but gimme a break...
Reply to
rangerssuck
...
Depends on the State, I'm sure.
Has always been so here (at least as far back I go which is early-post WWII...)
Reply to
dpb
The last time I went in for an exam it was early morning. The prescription/glasses didn't work out right and I went back. A different doc did another exam and I could tell (as a serviceman I had to do my share of "clean ups" behind incompetent coworkers...) he wasn't pleased. His prescription boosted the correction by .75 diopter for the troublesome eye/lens.
If/when I decide to go for another exam I will make sure it is late in the day when my eyes are "tired". In the morning my eyes seem to be able to focus better than later in the day which I suspect makes it harder to test them...
Reply to
Leon Fisk
As I mentioned, the Zennis which arrived don't help me to see. Noticably worse than the old prescription from 2007.
Took the Zennis to a small town optician, who checked them on his machine. Finds all but one or two are "spot on". One or two were just not quite right.
I took the Zennis to Walmart. Got several verbal jabs about "you didn't get them here!" and that I oughta bought one or two, rather than several. Zenni? "I've heard about them, they are expensive."
After a while, they did offer me a free recheck, which will be Monday. I'll post then, tell you how things go.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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Reply to
Stormin Mormon
Very good point; I certainly notice (being in my 60's and therfore having less accomodation) that I have more difficulty in focusssing when I am tired or stressed.
Reply to
Newshound
Are you diabetic, or do you have high blood pressure? They can both cause your vision to change throughout the day.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
So the lenses are fine and you are not? Where did you get the prescription? I've been overcorrected a couple of times, which is odd since most of the exam is "which is better, this or that". My prescription has been more or less stable for decades so I have to conclude either my vision does change slightly from time to time, or the point where you can't really decide which choice is better makes all the difference between okay and great.
Reply to
rbowman
No, but thanks for asking. Could certainly make a difference.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus
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Are you diabetic, or do you have high blood pressure? They can both cause your vision to change throughout the day.
Reply to
Stormin Mormon
None of these woes, in pretty good shape for middle age. Good points though...
While having my eyes tested I noticed how they would try mightily to fight change. The tester would switch to a different lens and my eyes would auto refocus to compensate. At some point in the lens switching my eyes couldn't adjust anymore... But I'm sure if the tester went backwards just one lens my eyes couldn't adjust to it either. Late in the day as me and my eyes have gotten "tired" I can't do this as well as earlier when I was a bit perkier. Personally I think that would be the best time to get your eyes tested (shrug).
Trying to focus on or see street signs at night is a somewhat special problem. For many people it will be late in their day (doubt they get up early enough to be in the dark much) and thus they will be a bit tired. Your eyes get tired too just like the rest of your body. Adding to the problem will be the low light conditions, moving vehicle, sign isn't where you think it should be... Your pupil will be wide open making it even harder to focus. It doesn't surprise me any that Stormin has problems with this. I have learned to cheat, lookup or learn what streets come before the one I need. I can usually read them okay as I'm driving PAST them, too late to turn down anymore :) With the advent of digital mapping it has become a whole lot easier to do this and having a GPS doesn't hurt any either.
Reply to
Leon Fisk
How long have you been reading posts by the King of Dead Batteries? Cheap is good, even if it doesn't work.
Reply to
rbowman
================ RE: The tester would switch to a different lens and my eyes would auto refocus to compensate.
The last few eye exams I have had were done at the eye clinic where I had cataract surgery. I had been going there for several years before the surgery and they always dilated my eyes to prevent such compensation, and to allow detailed inspection/examination of the interior of the eyes.
Although more expensive (but not that much) you may want to consider getting your eyes examined by an Ophthalmologist [MD] rather than an optician [not an MD] who will dilate your eyes and examine the interior of your eyes as part of the exam.
Be sure the eye glass prescription includes your IP [inter pupillary] distance. This is not normally included in the prescription (as this is measured by the glasses manufacturer when they take your order) but will be needed by Zini.
Reply to
F. George McDuffee
I think they need to use variable focus lenses and let the patient tweak them for best vision, then read the settings. A box with some thumb toggles would let you trim them easily. Then you could wait a few seconds and try it again. You are right about the focus changing.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
I have both, and I had some small hemmorages in the retina in one eye, but the doctor said they had healed when I was tested the last time.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
Interestingly that was my first time a true Ophthalmologist did the exam and also the only time the prescription was screwed up bad enough I had to have it done again. Other friends at the time said more or less the same thing you just did, "I should see a REAL eye doctor".
MD does not equal competent, just more expensive incompetence :)
Reply to
Leon Fisk
I think your right. Problem is I think people would just keep the "test" glasses and never go back. End of profits ;)
If you do a patent search on this rough idea you will find a few for variable strength glasses. A bit funky looking but at this point in my life I would rather have variable strength glasses and to hell with how they make me look. Dial in your own settings for reading, computer, close-up, distance...
Some info on this Wiki page:
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from the Wiki page, these look like what we want:
"...The power of the lenses varies from =E2=80=930.5 to =E2=80=936.5, and c= an be adjusted while the glasses are being worn. By turning the knobs on the side of the glasses, two lenses slide over each other, thus determining the power of the lenses..." See:
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No mention of where you can buy them. They don't have enough correction for my nearsightedness either...
Have you seen/heard about the Google glasses yet? For instance see:
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I could care less about the phone part but if you could use the camera portion to zoom in/out in real time that could be pretty useful to people with dodgy eyesight. Would be really cool for working on tiny stuff at the workbench or zooming in on Stormin's street sign.
--=20 Leon Fisk Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b Remove no.spam for email
Reply to
Leon Fisk
It would be kind of hard to drag around that chair & the boom to hold them up, though. ;-)
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I already have a USB microscope, and sometimes use a flatbed scanner to read books set in small fonts.
Reply to
Michael A. Terrell
'Friend called this afternoon wondering where he can get some progressive, wraparound, safety sunglasses. I was stumped so I told him to call Zenni and 39dollar on the telephone to see if they could sell him a good solution.
I'd like to give him your recommendation, if you would offer one, please.
--Winston
Reply to
Winston
They or others online and off have wraparounds with dorky frames inset. I've never seen good prescription wraparounds (where the lens is the actual lens)
Best inexpensive solution, just as functional as what they sell and cheaper, is a pair of tinted Norton 180's over glasses.
Reply to
Ecnerwal

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