Meddings drill repair

Hi All
I've just bought a secondhand Meddings Drilltru pillar drill which looked OK and and has no detectable slop at the chuck.
When I got it home on the floor I tried it on all the speeds and discovered a problem. On the highest speed I needed to put my foot on the base plate to keep it still and it was quite noisy.
On closer inspection I found that the quill pulley has been sleeved, and there appeared to be some runout. On dismantling I discovered that the shaft appears scored as though the pulley has been spinning (even though it is keyed).
Can anyone suggest a way to refit the pulley and be sure it'll run true. I'd be grateful for any suggestions.
Russell
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Mount the pulley on a mandril and recut the grooves true or press the sleeve out and rebore the pulley true and fit new sleeve.
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snipped-for-privacy@ems-fife.co.uk wrote:

The problem is that the shaft is a mess. I've been thinking about skimming the shaft but there's not a lot of meat on it as it's tubular and it doesn't look as though there'd be much keyway left. I've been wondering about building up the surface of the shaft but welding or brazing seem likely to cause distortion of the splines on the inside.
Russell
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Does the pulley need to slide on the shaft? If not, then maybe Loctite retainer will do the job, one of the gap-filling varieties. If the pulley is really sloppy, you'll need to find a way to secure it square to the shaft while the Loctite goes off. Metal spray or chroming the shaft might be another way, but might cost more than the machine is worth by the time it's been ground back to size?
Tim
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wrote:

Couldn't you contact Meddings and buy new parts? Bob
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Emimec wrote:

I tried that - the relevant part is apparently normally about a tenner - if it were available. I could get round it not being available by buying the pulley, shaft and quill assembly from a later drill if I wanted. (I don't want.)
My current thinking is to make a new sleave which is longer than the pulley so that it bridges the worn area of the shaft. I'll then Loctite that to the shaft so that any future dismantling won't need to disturb the worn section.
Can anyone see any flaws in that plan?
Russell
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Tim Leech wrote:

Thanks for the suggestions and in particular Tim's which got me thinking on the right lines. There's a picture here of the drill running at max speed (about 4000rpm) which shows success. It's not fastened down.
http://www.hockerley.plus.com/drill.jpg
Russell
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