Myford ML7 clutch

Hi,
I have just joined, so I am not sure if I am on the right part of th
site, for this question.
Anyway, I have recently bought an old Myford ML7. It was in reasonabl
condition; just requiring rescaling, painting and a few odd bits.
It does not have a clutch and it appears to me that they are quite har
to get hold of.
I was wondering if the clutch off a Super 7 will fit or can be adapte
to fit. Alternatively, has anybody made one similar to the original?
Thanks,
Pau
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paulsco
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Paul, the clutch for an ML7 is far from standard. Again, there are two Super 7 clutches but I doubt either will fit a ML7.
I recall two designs and one was an early one in MEW.
Why not go to YahooGroups and MyMyford.
Norm
Reply to
ravensworth2674
Hi Norm,
Thanks for your reply. I can see that the construction of one like the original with brak shoes might be a bit of a challenge, but something like the later S with the clutch plate design and a rod through the centre of th countershaft to engage/disengage it, might not be so challenging. I note that the early S7's had a very similar clutch to the ML7; I jus wondered if it in fact used the same parts??
Pau
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paulsco
Paul,
You might be able to adapt one of these:
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(scroll down to the bottom of the .pdf to see mounting examples - ther are some with integrated pulleys I think.
Cheers,
Garth
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Paul
I think one of the early Model Engineers Workshop magazines had an article on making a suitable clutch for an ML7, if I have time in the next couple of days I'll see if I can find it although someone on here with a full set of MEW might be quicker (hint chaps). There is a very simple one shown on this page that uses the belt to produce a clutch. I used a similar one with reasonable success for many years on my Speed 10.
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Keith
Reply to
jontom_1uk
Paul, Google into Geof Howe's Workshop Projects 1 and 2 You might add your comments.
Norman
Reply to
ravensworth2674
Hi,
Thanks for all your comments.
I have seen the belt type clutch before and although I appreciate it i a possible solution, if it came down to making a clutch, I was reall looking to making something along the lines of the original, or a least the S7. As far as I can see, the hardest part would be to make and bore a bar or an original countershaft to take the rod that activates the clutch I'm fairly new to this type of enginerring, so I may not appreciat just how difficult that this is likely to be. Using a more readily available clutch from an S7 seemed like a possibl solution.
Thanks again,
Pau
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paulsco
I vaguely recall an article years ago where someone had adapted a motorbike clutch for this purpose. It would have been before the days of MEW so likely to have been ME or EIM
Just looked at the indexes onlne
EIM May 86 and ME 110/2755/264 and 143/3553/96 (Volume/issue/page) might be of interest.
hth
Bob
Reply to
Bob Minchin
Difficult. The actuating rod is 0.375" and keeping this bore straight over about 11" is something I chickened out of when I had to replace the worn countershaft spindle and rod on my ML7.
I got my friendly press toolmaker to wire erode the hole through the 3/4" silver steel shaft so it came out perfect.
Peter
Reply to
Peter Neill
On Sun, 02 Dec 2007 13:01:16 GMT, Bob Minchin wrote, in impeccable English,..
or you could try a Singer industrial sewing m/c clutch/brake/motor unit. The Mardrive was a modified one for use on Pultra lathes.
I've got one here. 1/3 hp s.p. 1425rpm. Includes operating pedal and switchbox containing capacitors and wiring schematic for direction. There is also wiring output for a light (I suppose mains voltage). Usual disclaimers concerning wiring, of course. It runs, quietly.
The brake is easily removed/adjusted so your chuck doesn't spin off.
I'm in mid Wales, very close to the Llanfair-Welshpool narrow gauge line.
Take it away on condition YOU lift it into your car, I can't (and I'm keeping the table)
Ray
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Ray
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paulsco
I wouldn't say that Wire EDM is something that an ordinary job shop has, although many may well have a plunge EDM, which is different and not really suitable. The other advantage I had was that my press toolmaker had a machine with enough Z height (12"), again this is perhaps not that common.
As for price, mine was done for material cost plus a little bit, but then again we had put about £300K worth of business that way over the past few years.
A better bet may be to find a job shop that has a gun drill, or buy an extra-long series drill, drill and ream the hole in oversize stock, then turn the outside between centres to get it parallel.
I just used wire EDM as it was cheap and very handy for me. Remember that Myford didn't do it this way:)
Peter
Reply to
Peter Neill
. Paul,
Norm mentioned ..............
There was indeed an article for an ML7 clutch in MEW for June/July 1991, which also had freebie drawings included with the magazine.
I have one of these clutches fitted to my machine, and it is quite satisfactory.
I have both the article and the two drawing sheets which could be copied if required. ( Well, maybe I should say made available if we are to keep out of copyright !!!) Drop me an email if this would help.
Mike
Reply to
Mike
There is the other possibility: Buy the hole. 3/4" OD tube is available with a 1/4" wall.
Tom
Reply to
Tom
Now that, Sir, is what is called lateral thinking!
Reply to
Mike
Hi Tom/Mike,
That is a good Idea. I have done an Internet search, but have come u with nothing. Where can I get ¾ inch ¼ wall tubing?
Is it Silver steel?
Thanks,
Pau
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paulsco
Contrary to widespread belief, the Internet is not the Cornucopia that encompasses the World, especially in matters of steel supply.
The Yellow Pages are superior in many respects. Tubing (steel) is a good start.
No, usually 1020-26. Why would you want silver steel?
Tom
Reply to
Tom
I can't answer for Paul, but there are a few reasons as to why it is a good choice for this.
1) It's nice and tough, with a reasonably hard surface as supplied. 2) It's precisely ground to a consistent diameter over its length. 3) The finely ground finish is suitable for running in bronze bearings. 4) It's a mere £10 for a 13" length of 3/4" diameter.
Peter
Reply to
Peter Neill
Hi Mike,
I would be vey intrested in seeing this article and drawings. Is it similar clutch to the original? Ether way, I would like to see it There is no link to your email address. perhaps you could email m direct. snipped-for-privacy@ntlworld.com
Thanks, Pau
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paulsco
You are better off, using a telephone and a decent city phone book. You want a real metal supplier.
Ask for thick wall steel tubing, and see what he (or she) has to say. Dunno about your side of the pond, but over here, the stuff I would be after is 3/4 OD, .250 wall DOM tubing. Drawn Over Mandrel (mandrell?).
Don't get too picky on the material, take what you can get. Slow speeds and really sharp tools will make as much, or more difference in your finishes, than the material, most of the time.
Got any gunsmiths about? See if you can beg or buy a section cut from a removed rifle barrel. Very nice stuff to machine. You may have to turn the outside down to parrallel sides, from a taper. No big deal. If he asks, tell him exactly what you are going to do with it. I have not heard that possesion of steel tubing with twisty scratches down it is a crime over there yet, but I may be running behind a bit...:-) He may or may not feel inclined to run a reamer through it to remove the "scratches" but that is just a thought...
Cheers Trevor Jones
Reply to
Trevor Jones

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