Nickel plating

Does anyone have experience of DIY nickel plating?
There appear to be several firms selling kits of chemicals but I wonder if there are many snags that can cause a poor quality finish.
ISTR that it is normal to copper plate steel before nickeling - will it work OK without?
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I thought copper was normally plated on first. The biggest question in my mind is what do you do with the used chemicals?
Wes
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Wes wrote:

> > The copper solution no problem, spray your tomatoes. :-)
Tom
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom wrote:

Wouldnt copper plated tomatoes be a bit crunchy? ;)
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
dave sanderson wrote:

Better than soggy ones, surely? Gardening not your thing, Dave? :-)
Tom
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    I have used kits from several different companies over the years. Within the context of the small scale of a home workshop,- we're talking about small items like nuts and bolts rather than re-plating girt Austin Seven radiator shells here - I've generally found the system to be OK and relatively trouble free. They all provide simple instructions, and, provided you follow them, you will probably be pleasantly surprised with the results.
    Polishing and degreasing are the primary preparations. Remember, above all, that the condition and quality of the underlying unplated surface will be what largely dictates the quality of the subsequent finish. At a thou or so thick, it's not like paint where you can obliterates all the pits and scratches with a second coat.
    Chemical disposal hasn't been a problem - you simply pour the (relatively harmless) nickel salts solution back into a suitable plastic jug for re-use. I'm still using stuff I made up ten years ago with the occasional boost from a bit more of the salts now and again.
    Google 'home nickel plating' and ask somebody like Frost (www.frost.co.uk), the car tarter-uppers to send you a copy of the instructions to have a look at first if you're not sure of what's involved.     The cost of the usual 'basic' kit used to be about 50 when I last looked.      --
Chris Edwards (in deepest Dorset) "....there *must* be an easier way!"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
.
Chris Edwards tells us ...

I fear that John Stevenson might be a bit miffed if you did. Re-plating Girt indeed!!!!!!!!
Sorry Chris, could not resist that, and there certainly would be an easier way.
Mike
--
Mike Whittome
Still searching for the easier way.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

The mind boggles .... never really been into this AC/DC stuff... have to ask Gert.<g> -- Regards,
John Stevenson Nottingham, England.
Visit the new Model Engineering adverts page at:- http://www.homeworkshop.org.uk /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

John, believe me, if you have to ask or if Gert hasn't felt the need to explain it then it's probably best left alone. VBG :-)
Regards
Keith
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BobKellock wrote:

The "Workshop practice" series has a booklet about plating (Camden-books has them). It explains all (?) defects and their cure. Seems to be a good book, but I didn't try it out.
Nick
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I have used the kit supplied from GLR for some years now and get good results (my standards!). As stated by an earlier post the secret is a good clean (chemically) component and a good surface finish as a starting point. The GLR kit comes with all the required salts and anodes etc but you have to make up your own tank, current control and component holders but the instructions give guidance on all this.
Alan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ISTR an article on nickel plating in MEW around the late 90s or early 00s - I have just been thumbing through all my copies from no. 1 over the last few weeks. From memory, he used one of the commercial kits (may have been Techtrate) and was quite pleased with the results.
David
--
David Littlewood

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
There've been postings on this before. I began using the Dynic Sales kit about 20 years ago when rebuilding an old Brit bike. As b4, surface prepn is vital for a good finish. But and it's a big 'but' ~ if you haven't much patience, there's an awful lot of buggeration involved. This includes accurate control of temp., agitation, current (need a steady DC source not a battery charger) and your source of pure nickel. You can plate directly onto steel, no need for Cu plating first.
If you want I can email the detailed Dynic instructions.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Polytechforum.com is a website by engineers for engineers. It is not affiliated with any of manufacturers or vendors discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.