Removing small roll pins

I need to remove some small roll pins (1/16" and 3/32") and am unable to think of a simple, non-brutal, method
So far I have failed to remove a 3/32" pin with punch and hammer but this may be due to my reluctance to use too much brute force. I have not yet attempted the 1/16" pins because they are currently inaccessible (at least with punch and hammer) unless ...
... wait for it ...
... I remove some small roll pins and a couple of interference fits that I was hoping not to need to disturb.
--
Mike Hopkins
CSME <http://www.cheltsme.org.uk>
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Mike H wrote:

Dont know .. I've had no trouble using this home made punch
the bit on the front goes inside the roll pin so keeping in from distorting ..mushrooming etc.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v190/aboard_epsilon/rover%20420/DRIFT.jpg
All the best.mark
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Many thanks for that but by the time you get down to my sizes (1/16" and 3.32") it is almost watch-making. I have had to make a sleeve to stop the drift bending.
--
Mike Hopkins
CSME <http://www.cheltsme.org.uk>
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Are they in blind holes? If not I agree with Mark, a well fitting punch is the thing and made from something better than M.S.but not too hard a condition. The pilot doesn't need to be long, just enough to locate it. Obviously the shaft must be very well supported. Jim.
writes

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Mike H wrote:

I find the punches bend if you apply repeated inadequate force, as opposed to one whack of the correct power. The smaller roll pins do tend to give me more strife than the larger ones 'cos I'm loathe to apply the required force to start them moving. I find a carefully used pneumatic hammer (yes, really!)reduces the amount of potential damage, with an appropriately shaped bit.
--
Karen

If you can't be a good example, then you'll just have to be a horrible warning.'
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On or around Wed, 24 Jan 2007 07:45:42 +1000, Duracell Bunny

See, there really are only 200 people on usenet.
I agree, a single smart whack with the pin and punch nicely aligned works best.
--
Austin Shackles. www.ddol-las.net my opinions are just that
"Quos deus vult perdere, prius dementat" Euripedes, quoted in
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Oh yes.
Always assuming they *are* roll pins and not taper pins going the wrong way... ;^)
--
Nigel

When the only tools you have are a Bridgeport, a CNC Taig Mill, a Colchester
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Austin Shackles wrote:

I mostly lurk here, mopping up the gems of information like a sponge. It's not often I can contribute as there is some pretty impressive knowledge here - I'm strictly an amateur engineer, I've made a few steam engines from Stuart Turner casting kits but any time-served fitter would roll their eyes at some (?most?) of my work! But always keen & willing to learn, Austin!
--
Karen

If you can't be a good example, then you'll just have to be a horrible warning.'
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Duracell Bunny wrote:

I think this might be because if you're not successful, you have to strike more blows, and so there's more chance of striking the punch with an off-axis blow, which could cause it to bend. There's also the fact that if you're unsuccessful, you're going to get frustrated, and so might not be so careful.
Best wishes,
Chris
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Christopher Tidy wrote:

One of my frequent tasks is the removal and installation of small roll pins. If you are going to deal with small ones, frequently, spend the money and buy a decent quality roll pin punch set.
They have a concaved end, with a nipple in the middle, purportedly to keep the end of the pin from mushrooming. Sometimes it works out that way, too.
I deal with a lot of munged up 1/16 inch size roll pins, an end up drilling many out. A selection of small drills, and a decent drill motor are a requirement, as is a light touch.
Driving roll pins with a 1/16" punch is a fast lesson in applying hammer blows in a straight line with the punch and pin, else the punch ends up much too short, or much too bent.
Cheers Trevor Jones
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writes

This might be a good application for a slide hammer type device. In many cases having the force directly in line makes a big difference.
Don Young (USA)
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