The Holiest of Holies?

SWMBO queried why so many of my T-shirts have a plague of holes only down the left side?
It's that bloody Rocol spewing off whatever is held in the chuck!
Looking up Rocol on Google suggests that it is the most insidious of chemicals.
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On 27/07/2013 11:58, gareth wrote:

I just have and the ones I saw say "No significant hazard". What are you using? What am I missing? Is SWMBO angling for a new washing machine?
--
Mike Perkins
Video Solutions Ltd
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That is, indeed, a good question. Some months ago I was suffering from headaches after using the stuff, and when I googled about it, found much information about its ill-health effects; inhaling the vapours, eczema, poisonous if ingested (eg licking one's finger after a cut)
Now, today, following your query, cannot locate that same info.
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On 27/07/2013 16:16, gareth wrote:

I don't doubt your symptoms. It's best to avoid long term inhalation of such materials.
I was more interested how it could make holes in your clothes?
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Mike Perkins
Video Solutions Ltd
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On 27/07/2013 15:40, Mike Perkins wrote:

I've not had trouble with RTD Cleancut, which would be the Rocol I'd assume he'd be using here. As I recall, it is mildly alkali (pH > 7) but not enough to be an issue. I'm pretty sure it also mixes with water based lubs so dilutes further.
Perhaps something else is going on? Contamination?
I don't do much machining these days but the above is certainly my recollection.
The OP wasn't machining something 'unusual' which perhaps (still) overheated.
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On 08/08/2013 22:19, Brian Reay wrote:

The advantages of having a Chemist at hand to consult: Any PVC,Teflon, or other fluorinated/chlorinated plastics being machined (and thus heated)? All produce 'nasty' compounds you don't want to be breathing. Even PVC will produce HCl. I think I have summarised that correctly.
Teflon has to get rather 'hot' to break down (not much good for pans other wise) but PVC (and perhaps other plastics in the family?) will breakdown at more modest tempratures.
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On 08/08/13 21:59, Brian Reay wrote:

IIRC, hot teflon releases HF (hydrogen fluoride). HF is bad news, and small amounts inhaled (or absorbed by the skin) are often fatal.
(I used to work with 30%, 60% and 90% hydrofluoric acid, so I'm reasonably genned-up on how to avoid it like the plague.
--
Rusty Hinge
To err is human. To really foul things up requires a computer and the
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On 09/08/2013 20:33, RustyHinge wrote:

Hydrofluoric Acid is, I believe, capable of 'attacking' glass and, as you say, nasty stuff.
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On 10/08/13 09:05, Brian Reay wrote:

It is used to etch glass.
If any penetrates tissue as far as bone, it might still require an amputation. If it gets a hold (i.e. not washed off *immediately*) and a red patch appears, the area must be (well, always used to be) raised on a subcutaneous bubble of sodium glutamo glutamate.
I've had *that* treatment twice.
--
Rusty Hinge
To err is human. To really foul things up requires a computer and the
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On 10/08/13 16:20, RustyHinge wrote:

Indeed. While it's not quite in my "things I won't work with" list[#], it's close.
[#]http://pipeline.corante.com/archives/things_i_wont_work_with/

Calcium glutamate is the traditional one.
Nowadays for very bad but localised burns sometimes calcium chloride isolated perfusion is used, where eg the hand is separated from the body's blood circulation with a tourniquet and calcium chloride solution is pumped through the arteries and veins.

Ouch.
I haven't commented in this thread so far, as I don't know what type of Rocol the OP was referring to - googling, I found several hundred possibilities.
-- Peter Fairbrother
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Absolutely brilliant website; anyone with any interest in chemistry should read. I nearly wet myself laughing.

Calcium gluconate, I think you mean.
David
--
David Littlewood

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On 10/08/13 16:20, RustyHinge wrote:

Ouch! That doesn't appeal one bit.
I've a current "domestic request" for assist with drilling glass plates- a job I'm viewing with some dread.
I was thinking of 'etching' as a remote option but can't think how to control the size, beyond the initial contact area.
I suspect I will be back to drilling. A 'putty dam', oil / paraffin, and a slow 'glass drill' in the pillar drill. Only 3 plates to drill but I think it will seem like many more. I don't recall drilling glass in the past- other that the 'glaze' on tiles.
The glass is of unknown type- beyond it is used to make plates.
Tips welcome.
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On 14/08/13 12:33, Brian Reay wrote:

Buy a diamond hole saw, readily available cheaply in many sizes off ebay. This sort of thing http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Diamond-Holesaw-6mm-45mm-Tile-ceramic-glass-porcelain-marble-drill-UK-seller-/251157798718 . Use water as a lubricant/coolant inside your dam.
When you say plates do you mean like dinner plates? if so they may be Pyrex and I think OK to drill if of European manufacture as not toughened. US made Pyrex products don't use a borosilicate glass and are toughened so drilling is out unless you want lots of little pieces.
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On 14/08/13 12:57, David Billington wrote:

Thank you.
They are dinner type plates but not Pyrex type. They are much more 'pretty' the sort of thing you would look at not eat off.
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On 14/08/13 13:14, Brian Reay wrote:

Are these possibly hand blown glass plates?
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On 14/08/13 13:40, David Billington wrote:

I doubt it. From the price (a couple of Euros) I would think mass produced and that would be against much manual input.
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that wouldn't stop you fat boy ...
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Not being able to re-locate the original caveats that I encountered, I came across this today ...
http://docs-asia.electrocomponents.com/webdocs/080e/0900766b8080ee9c.pdf
BUT BUT BUT, on second thoughts, perhaps it wasn't the ROCOL, as that is applied sparingly (although it does bring on an incurable headache), but the diesel-engine lubricating oil with which I lubricate the jaws of the chucks. (as seen this morning, a small pool of oil underneath the chuck; unfortunately (!) having got some work at the age of 62, I've not been machining for the past 5 weeks, hence the chucks have remained stationary.
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There's absolutely nothing in there to corrode your clothing. You haven't confirmed yet which Rocol product you are accusing.
Cliff Coggin.
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Paraffin
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