Model of Baseball

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For a new goofy project, I need to create a baseball with the stiching
and all. Is there a place where I can find this Pro/E model?
Thank you and Merry Christmas.
Reply to
CADUSER
I had to do this once for a pool float chlorinator. It was a lot more difficult than the football and basketball.... The stitching ended up taking me all afternoon to figure out.
No, I'm afraid I'm not allowed to give it to you.
I think what I ended up doing was create a curve on the surface of the ball for the basic trajectory of the stitching. I then created a VSS surface with a trajpar to make it rotate rapidly around that curve. I intersected that surface and the surface of the ball to create the short curves sections that represent the little stitch trajectories. I then swept the stitches onto those curves. I created a map key to eliminate the redundant bits, so all I had to do was select the curves.
If you had a lot of time, you could first sweep surfaces onto those little segments, and use the surface vertex round function to create an edge to use for your stitches that would actually go into the ball like a real thread.
I suggest setting your accuracy fair tight before starting.
Perhaps someone knows a better technique that involves the new and improved pattern tools? David Janes?
Good luck.
Reply to
Polymer Man
I used a similar technique for a truck trailer hose (sweeping a helical hose along a central spline)
I'd suggest, if you're okay with having a simple 'doesn't look like a thread' tubular surface for your stitches, creating a construction surface inside & outside your real ball surface, then projecting on points to define where the stitch pierces the ball skin, and using a pipe to represent the stitches.
have fun!
Reply to
John Wade
I have a baseball model downloaded from internet some years ago as example. I think is 2001 version (sorry but I don't have ProE at home and I cannot check it). If you are interested I can email to you.
Lorenzo
snipped-for-privacy@XXX.COM wrote:
Reply to
DL
I think if it were me, I'd do the following: - Brush up on formed or wrapped curves (depending on what version of Pro you have) - Brush up on variable section sweeps - Wrap or form a curve onto the ball to represent the seam, that hour glass sort of shape. - If you want to show an actual seam, create var. sec. sweep along that curve. - Create a point on the curve at a distance by ratio and pattern it along the curve. This will be the placement of the stitches. - Referencing the first point you created, form a curve onto the ball representing the one of the stitches. - Do a var. sec. sweep protrusion to make one stitch. Then pattern it referencing the point pattern. - Repeat for the stitches on the other side of the seam.
I think that covers it, without having a baseball to look at. If the stitches alternate, you might have to create two point patterns - one for stitches on one side of the seam and one for stitches on the other side of the seam.
Good luck and let us all know how you wind up doing it.
snipped-for-privacy@XXX.COM wrote:
Reply to
CADaholic
I'm sure that the hard part of the baseball is the seam, the shape of the two interlocking halves of the cover. The link is to a mathematical explanation of the curve that makes the seam. Could be of some use, if you figure out how to get it into Pro/e. Probably use a spherical CSYS since the radius is known and remains constant and there's an angle that's calculated?
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If you get that part of it, the stitching should be relatively easy: a point offset, proportionally, from an end of the curve, an axis through the point, normal to the curve, then some curves on surface referencing the point and axis (possibly some additional datum rigging), then group and pattern points, etc to create the stitches (108, officially) using the offset or ratio.
David Janes
Reply to
David Janes
Maybe ...
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will be good for an ide'er two.
I believe the correct seam curve layout is two arcs projected from ortho planes.
I'd keep the stitch representations as simple as possible unless you don't mind large, sluggish files.
Reply to
Jeff Howard
Thank you for the link.
I tried several times to login in mcadcentral's site without any luck I get a weird error message, even when I tried to write to them.
If you have the .prt for the baseball, would you be so kind to post it in this forum?
This would be a huge help. Modeling this baseball is a difficult project for me knowing my Pro/E ability.
Thank you again!
large, sluggish files.
Reply to
caduser
Attachments can't be posted to this forum.
Try the link again. They go down periodically and you may have hit them at the right / wrong time. I don't believe you have to register or log on to download the file. All else failing, gimme an email addy and I'll send it (WF2 prt) to you.
Thank you for the link.
I tried several times to login in mcadcentral's site without any luck I get a weird error message, even when I tried to write to them.
If you have the .prt for the baseball, would you be so kind to post it in this forum?
This would be a huge help. Modeling this baseball is a difficult project for me knowing my Pro/E ability.
Thank you again!
Reply to
Jeff Howard
It worked this time! I downloaded the file and was able to open it without any problems.
Thanks and Happy & Healthy New Year!
Reply to
caduser
Hey, right back acha! Nice to see we could get you out of all that hard, challenging, puzzling, excruciating, difficult work of actually learning to use Pro/e effectively!!! Now you can do the REALLY hard stuff and effectively suck up to your boss!! Oh BOY!!! I'm just happy we got to teach you how to download files. WOOHOO!!!
David Janes
Reply to
David Janes
Wow, is that the one you can pick up for free at MCAD Central? Or did you actually take the plunge and figure out how to do it yourself!! Knowing you, probably the latter and on that condition, nice job, Paul. (The only thing missing is some puckering of the leather around the threads and a scuff mark or two.) BTW, here's some baseball manufacturing trivia:
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¡Viva Costa Rica! Yeah, it's just a baseball.
David Janes
Reply to
David Janes

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