Aerotech G-Force experiences

http://home.flash.net/~samily/stuff/HPR_metric8.pdf
BOOKMARK.
It solves so many problems. and it has pretty pictures.

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The G33 has, as you point out 72g propellant. Since that's over 62g, it's no longer a model rocket motor. That makes it HPR. Look at the data sheet on the NAR web page: it correctly identifies it as an HPR motor.
The F101 is HPR cuz it's over 80N average thrust. Ditto for the G104 and G125.
One more time for the Garrett Morris crowd:
There are several limits for what is a model rocket: total weight, total propellant weight, propellant weight of any single motor, average thrust of any single motor, and total impulse. [what did I forget?] Exceed any one of those limits, and your rocket is now an HPR rocket, requiring certification and use of the HPR safety code instead of the MR safety code.
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Bob Kaplow NAR # 18L >>> To reply, there's no internet on Mars (yet)! <<<
Kaplow Klips & Baffle: http://nira-rocketry.org/Document/MayJun00.pdf
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[looks like this post never went out Wednesday...]

313 of the old ones or 250 of the new ones! The total impulse in either case will only be an F motor.
6 D12s or 4 E9s put you over the 125g limit as well.
To summarize for those who might still be confused: exceed ANY of the many model rocket limits, and you have a high power rocket. And to fly a high power rocket requires user certification except for your cert flight attempt. The attempt requires the use of a high power motor, so you can't L1 cert with a cluster of D12s or E9s. There's got to be an H or I motor in there somewhere.
There are and always have been some major inconsistencies between the MR and HPR safety codes. The example I like to use is the 1499g rocket flown with a cluster of 3 F50 motors. It's a model rocket, doesn't require certification, and the safe distance is 30'. Now add 2 grams of wadding to the rocket, and it's now HPR, and the safe distance jumps to 200', more than 6 times the original safe distance.
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Bob Kaplow NAR # 18L >>> To reply, there's no internet on Mars (yet)! <<<
Kaplow Klips & Baffle: http://nira-rocketry.org/Document/MayJun00.pdf
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On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 17:35:54 -0500, "W. E. Fred Wallace"

Quite right, rockets need no certification. They do need to be passed by the RSO, even if the flyer is alone and acting as his own RSO. AR need not require use of certified motors or flyers. However, LMR is a red tape sweet spot. In this case a rocketeer (ideally an NAR or TRA member) without HPR certification or a LEUP, can purchase MR G motors containing 62.5 g. of propellant or less, and fly as many as two clustered in a rocket with a launch weight of no more than 1500 g., with simple FAA notification.
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