ROL NEWS--Apogee Releases RockSim v8 Software

Apogee Releases RockSim v8 Software May 6, 2005 Web posted at: 1:06 PM EDT
(ROL Newswire) -- The new RockSim v8 software has been released Apogee
Components and it is available for immediate download. The software allows modelers and educators to design any size model rocket, and then to simulate how high these might fly. What's new? The software is now available for either Windows or Macintosh computers, and can simulate both Tube-Fins, and Ring-Tail rocket configurations.
Another new feature is that RockSim now generates a realistic animation of the rocket's flight, including the fire and smoke coming out of the rocket engine. The smoke actually drifts with the wind, giving visual clues and perspective to the launch simulation. The animation allows designers to see what trajectory the rocket will take, and where the model is likely to land.
The software allows teachers to quickly and safely demonstrate common scientific principles, like "Newton's Laws of Motion," and aeronautic concepts of "Lift, Drag, Thrust, and Trajectory Flight." Modelers can also use it to create detailed simulation reports and graphs, which give the students further insight as to what is occurring during their rocket's flight. Tim Van Milligan of Apogee Components remarks, "Modelers say they've learned more in one hour of play than they have gotten in over a year of trial-and-error on the rocket range. RockSim is that useful!"
The software, which is used by over 856 schools throughout the USA, can simplify the rocket design process by allowing designers to stretch-and-pull common shapes into any size rocket they desire. Based on the shape, weight, and dimensions, the software then calculates how high and fast the rocket will fly with any commercially available model rocket engine. It also checks the stability of the rocket prior to flight, so that the designs will fly a straight and safe trajectory path.
The RockSim software is available for both Windows and Macintosh OS X computers. A free 30-day trial version can be downloaded at: www.ApogeeRockets.com/rocksim.asp
For more information contact: Tel: 719-535-9335 or Web site: www.ApogeeRockets.com/rocksim.asp
Source: Apogee Components
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wrote:

I wonder -- since MacOS X is based on a BSD-style Unix "under the hood", would it be that difficult to port to other "Unix-ish" operating systems? I'm thinking, of course, of Linux....
- Rick "Version 9?" Dickinson
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Rick Dickinson wrote:

Depends. I've recently been trying to port an old command-line C program of mine to Mac OSX. The code compiled and linked great. Trying to write the user interface is daunting, howver. Carbon seems way more obtuse than X11, which I used many years ago. Switching from Mac OSX's API to X11 for Linux would be tough.
However, if it was (re)written using one of the cross-platform GUI packages (like Qt from Trolltech) then it might be an easy thing to do. I suppose we'll have to wait and see.
Also, it seems that the 'free 30-day trial version' is not yet available.
Mark E. Hamilton NAR #48641-SR ARSA #418
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There is now an X11 utility for OSX.

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Jerry Irvine wrote:

True. But if the program wasn't written using the X11 API, rewriting it is difficult. It's probably not as much effort as porting it to Mac OSX, but it still might not be worth the effort to the author.
Like I said, though, if it was written with an API like Qt, porting it to Windows, X11, and MacOS is simply a recompile and link.
http://www.trolltech.com/products/qt/index.html
This is pure speculation on my part, however.
Mark E. Hamilton NAR #48641-SR ARSA #418
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There are projects to do that. But also you can compile Linux "services" to OSX in some cases.
http://developer.apple.com/macosx /
Check out Carbon, Cocoa, and Darwin.
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