SpaceShipOne in outer space video

This is a video of the recent SpaceShipOne test flight and shows the hybrid engine at mach4 in outer space ..... courtesy of Dynasoar........
http://www.dailypress.com/la-xprizestory051304-rm,0,6981061.realvideo
shockie B)
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No it doesn't. It achieved an altitude of only 40 miles. That ain't outer space.
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There is no mach number in space. You must be in a fluid to have a mach number. Space is a vacuum.
-Fred Shecter NAR 20117
-- """Remove "zorch" from address (2 places) to reply.

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On Wed, 19 May 2004 13:11:35 GMT, "Fred Shecter"

Not completely though, huh? I mean, there are a few stray atoms here, and there...
So, Mach 1 would be, like...
/Dr. Evil
"1 Gazil-ilbil-i-quilizillion MPH!"
Dr. Evil/
<vbg>
tah
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snipped-for-privacy@weinerboy.org wrote:

Would that be, Dr. Evil from somewhere in New Jersey?
:)
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tod hilty weinerboy wrote:

Uhhh...errr...uuhh...Tod, old friend, old pal, er, uh, the speed of sound goes down with decreasing air density (increasing altitude), so the mach value in a vacuum would be more like
1 over "1 Gazil-ilbil-i-quilizillion" MPH!
Think more like Tim Conway's old man character.
Or the LSD scenes from bad movies :)
Or the speed of the SOB in front of you when you're late for work.
Doug
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On Wed, 19 May 2004 16:23:19 +0000 (UTC), "Doug Sams"

Doh! Yep, you're right, Doug! I was thinking backwards. Must be the effects of this damn Van DeGraaff generator my daughter and I built. I've zapped myself enough such that my right forearm was twitching there for awhile...
I wonder how many static shocks a human can take before brain damage occurs?
<vbg>
Wow! What a ball to play with! We're pulling 5" sparks with 97% humidity! Imagine what it would do on a cold winter day around these parts.

Hmmm... the end of Easy Rider?
<g>
tah
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The speed of sound in the atmosphere is a function of temperature.
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On Wed, 19 May 2004 19:19:50 GMT, "Steven P. McNicoll"

The speed of sound in the atmosphere is proportional to the square root of temperature. The universe background "temperature" is around 3 Deg. K. Interstellar gas density is on the order of one hydrogen per cc. Such gas does not flow like an atmospheric gas, but you do have Newtonian flow, which can still be a problem when you get your starship up to speed. The Shuttle and space station do not have great vacuum because of all the local outgassing. In an earth bound lab, you can get a better vacuum by sweeping and trapping gas molecules.
Alan
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Which means the speed of sound in the atmosphere is a function of temperature.
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On Thu, 20 May 2004 03:05:08 GMT, "Steven P. McNicoll"

Amoung other things, but you repeat yourself.
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No, not among other things, just temperature.

As did you. Did you realize you were doing so when you did it?
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Temperature and pressure and CDr

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No, not temperature and pressure and CDr, just temperature.
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Negative. the speed of sound is a function of DENSITY. NOTHING else.
Temperature effects density and that is the only way that temperature effects the speed of sound.
sound will travel through a shaft of solid steel at 70' faster than it will travel through the same physical space of AIR at 70' and 1 ATM.
Density decides what the speed of sound is.
Chris Taylor http://www.nerys.com /

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On Thu, 20 May 2004 19:30:42 -0400, "Chris Taylor Jr"

Um..
so..
Temperature has an affect on the speed of sound even though you said density is the only function, and, um, temperature is related to density, and um, temperature is, like density, a phyiscal property of matter, and um, and nothing else? And, the speed of sound is a function of density, and nothing else........
WHAT DO I WIN?! WHAT DO I WIN?!
Nice to have you back, Chris...
<g>
tah
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that is like saying that the jet engine is a function of the speed of sound since it lets you GO the speed of sound and is foolish logic.
temperature is irrevant and here is how to prove it.
you can have two objects at the exact same temperature and yet the speed or sound through them WILL be different.
since we have removed temperature from the equation and yet still have a difference we know temperature is NOT directly a factor. only indirectly in that is can alter density. density is what directly affects the speed of sound.
if you can alter density via temp fine. but its secondary. indirect.
density is the key.
thanks. very very busy :-( new jobs working 7 days a week :-(
Chris Taylor http://www.nerys.com /

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Chris, you're confusing two different issues... you're talking about differences in the speed of sound through different _kinds of materials_ (comparing liquids to gases) but the question - for purposes of describing a "mach number" in flight - was about how the speed changes in the SAME KIND of material, at different pressures and temperatures. How does AIR change its speed of sound at different pressures or at different temperatures? That turns out to be a quite separate question from the difference between different kinds of material, as in comparing air to liquids or solids!
-dave w
Chris Taylor Jr wrote:

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because it has a different DENSITY down here than it does up there.
in the SAME material pressure and temperature do not effect speed of sound. it effects DENSITY which then effect speed of sound.
at least that is what I was taught :-)
Chris Taylor http://www.zodiacreview.com /

temperatures?
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Chris Taylor Jr wrote:

No, you have it backwards. At the same temperature, the speed of sound will be the same (in a given medium such as air) at widely different densities. For example, consider the following values from standard atmosphere data:
Altitude Density Temp SofS (meters) (g/m^3) deg. C m/sec -------- ------ ------ ---- 5000 736 -17.5 320 15000 193 -56.5 295 41500 3.09 -17.9 320
The density is many times lower at 41500 meters, but the speed of sound is about the same as at 5000 meters, because the temperature is the same. At an intermediate value of density at 15000 meters, the speed of sound and the temperature are both noticeably lower than at the higher or the lower altitude. (Source of the data was the Standard Atmosphere Computations web page at http://aero.stanford.edu/StdAtm.html - you can put in any altitude in feet or meters and it will give you the density, temperature, and speed of sound, among other characteristics of the air at that altitude).
-dave w
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