SpaceShipOne in outer space video

The US Air Force defined the beginning of space as 50 miles altitude. Any X-15 pilot who exceeded this altitude received Astronaut Wings.
Mario Perdue NAR #22012 Sr. L2 for email drop the planet
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"X-ray-Delta-One, this is Mission Control, two-one-five-six, transmission concluded."
Reply to
Mario Perdue
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Yes, I know that. But it was stated that, "Space is variously defined as 55 miles and 62 miles (100km)...". I'd like to know who defines space as 55 miles.
No, the USAF X-15 pilots that exceeded 50 miles were awarded astronaut wings. The NASA X-15 pilots that exceeded 50 miles did not receive them.
Reply to
Steven P. McNicoll
The speed of sound in the atmosphere is proportional to the square root of temperature. The universe background "temperature" is around 3 Deg. K. Interstellar gas density is on the order of one hydrogen per cc. Such gas does not flow like an atmospheric gas, but you do have Newtonian flow, which can still be a problem when you get your starship up to speed. The Shuttle and space station do not have great vacuum because of all the local outgassing. In an earth bound lab, you can get a better vacuum by sweeping and trapping gas molecules.
Alan
Reply to
Alan Jones
I wondered about that as well. Note that the "official" flight path does describe a circle.
Other oddity of the video: the image of earth changes from a dish to a ball several times. How much of the (pronounced) earth curvature is real in that vid ?
Reply to
Scott Moore
Neither Burt nor Korey have propelled their or any bodies into space nor will any time soon.
Both have propelled OBJECTS to near space.
Just Korey did so on the far side of near :)
Reply to
Jerry Irvine
I'd guess nearly all of the curvature seen in the video is due to the lens used on the camera.
You'd see exactly the same effect playing with a fish-eye lens on the ground. In a landscape shot, as the horizon is placed above the center of the field, it appears to bow upward slightly, as in these photos:
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When the horizon is below center, the horizon bows the opposite way, for example:
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Reply to
Eric Ellington
Space is a vacuum that is adequate for most things but not for all. A few years ago I was involved in adapting some electron column instruments for use on the space station. As part of the project we received some pressure readings. In case you did not know, a Torr is a unit of pressure equal to 1/760 of an atmosphere. The static pressure in the vicinity of the space station is 10-6 Torr (ten to the minus six Torr). The total pressure in front of the station is 10-3 Torr (ten to the minus three Torr) and the pressure behind the station is 10 -9 Torr (ten to the minus nine Torr). This was fine for most of the uses contemplated, but there were a few where we normally ran at 10-12 Torr (ten to the minus twelve Torr). The 10-3 Torr in front of the station is the concern for station keeping and what brought SkyLab down.
Jack Kane
Brad Hitch wrote:
Reply to
Jack Kane
And he had the altitude record for commercial hybrids as well, as seen in Aviation Week.
Korey Kline, the Ace of space.
Jerry
Reply to
Jerry Irvine

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