Dachau diorama?

Has anyone ever seen a diorama of Dachau or Auschwitz,
maybe the railroads cars at Dachau filled with emaciated corpses,
with US soldiers rescuing the still living from the dead?
Or maybe even the slaughter of the German guards at Dachau?
Maybe a Japanese prison camp? Or a rape of Nanking scene?
The piles of burnt dead in Dresden? The charred corpses of
Hiroshima or better yet, the burnt but stilling living civilians,
including the children? I have been thinking about the Webling incident
where a company in my Dad's regiment lined up about 50 of captured SS
and shot them down in retaliation for the shooting of
an American soldier.
Just a freindly reminder that war isn't always just about spiffy paint
and markings.
Reply to
old hoodoo
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Thank you for that i`ve been feeling really down today and your post really cheered me up. Bloody hell.
Reply to
darren jones
What a fantastic idea, the only problem I have now is deciding which of your great suggestions to do first. Quite agree war isnt JUST about "Spiffy" paint and markings, with a bit of luck blood and guts can be involved.
I would also like to thank you for bringing back "spiffy", a word sadly not used for almost 100 years, but one I will now try to use on a daily basis.
Again many thanks for your suggestion, you really are the Dogs bolloxs as far as Im concerned.
Reply to
Bigbilly
Ive just thought up one I would like to do not on the list MY LAI, but not sure if this counts. Was Vietnam a War or a "Policing action"?
Reply to
Bigbilly
old hoodoo wrote in news:ppb_f.3734$gE.1036 @dukeread06:
Well for the museum I work for I made a 1/72nd dio about a 1,5m long (that would be 5ft) about Mittelberg, the underground V2 assembly lines. (A lot of V2's (and even more V1's) were fired from our region)
Although the subject of the dio leaned heavily to the technical side of the construction of the V2, we made sure that te human side was not left out. In pictures AND stories.
I painted a lot of (143 to be precise) grey/white striped labour workers.
And I do think that a lot of modelers do know the dark side of the (any) war, but the spiffy paint and markings are the things one can more easyly(?) identify oneself with.
I don't think a very gory dio about a pile of dead will do very good in the showcase in my local hobby shop. Though we may NEVER forget this side of war.
Yesterday I watched "We Were Soldiers" I don't know why, but I had to think how the Vietnamese would watch this movie. (if ever).
Cheers,
Dennis
Reply to
Mechanical Menace
Not sure what prompted the need to throw red meat to the dogs - but I'm guessing the average modeller is far more respectful and understanding of the true horrors of war as opposed to the average John Q Public that seems to bump into Leno during his "Jay-walking" segments.
BTW, you overlooked a hell-u-va lot of atrocities. Some, if not most, might even argue the mere practice of war is an atrocity. The devil I suppose is in the details of defining where lies the necessity for war.
Sherman said "War is hell". I'm thinking that maybe picking up the pieces afterwards may be among the hottest parts of the journey for those unfortunate enough to get swept up in a war. Let's not wish one on anyone and maybe the world will be a better place.
But with fanatics like Mad Ahmadinejad in Tehran, I doubt the truce will stick.
WmB
Reply to
WmB
I thought the inclusion of the North Vietnamese "side of the coin" was this movie's greatest strength. For the first time, we get a glimpse of the North Vietnamese point of view in a major motion picture, something that has been lacking in just about all of the previous movies on this subject. Personally, I found it very interesting. In order to gain an understand about something as controversial as the Vietnam War, it is necessary to learn about the motivations of all the participants.
Martin
Reply to
The Collector
Do you have a Site ? Any pic's to view ? Love to see that .
Noddy
Reply to
noddy
noddy wrote in news:Gnd_f.11292$_u1.5428@pd7tw2no:
Well, I'd like to see it back myself but in the Fireworks disater we had in may 2000, this dio, and a lot of others I had made for the museum were burned/destroyed. together with my 30 year collection of lead toy soldiers and moulds.
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Reply to
Mechanical Menace
Years ago, Kim Jones, one of "the Tulsa boys" did a simple vignette, showing a Black U.S. soldier carrying out a concentration camp victim, in his arms. Because of the simplicity, and the focus on the two scratchbuilt figures, it was *very* effective...probably more than a large diorama would ever be.
Reply to
Greg Heilers
Closest I have seen was one at IPMS Nats in Dallas I think showing a scene at a railroad station with people being loaded in boxcars to send to a camp. Very powerful.
Reply to
Hub & Diane Plott III
Most powerful "diorama" I ever saw was a 1:1 at Yad Vashem in Jerusalem.. just a boxcar on a piece of track leading out into empty space.........
old hoodoo wrote:
Reply to
z
I've made that point from time to time.
Reply to
Bill Woodier
If you were over there getting shot at, it was a war. Trust me on that one.
Reply to
Bill Woodier
True. However, movies don't always portray actions, motives, intentions, etc accurately; some might argue Hollywood misses the accuracy mark (either deliberately or unintentionally) more that they hit it. If you're looking for this sort of info, better to look for it in the library or other credible research establishment.
Reply to
Bill Woodier
in the 80's, i saw a series of books from spain that covered all the death camps. they were the most horrendously accurate references i've ever seen. they printed all the pictures the others avoided, in abundance. a good example would be an ss guard hacking a man to pieces with a shovel. there was much worse. i beleive they were intended as horor exploitation as they were short on dialogue and long on photos. they were actually too much. anyone else seen those?
Reply to
e
" WmB" wrote in news:sCF_f.5585$ snipped-for-privacy@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net:
That is one thing that was the order of the day. You could ofcourse refuse an order, but that would certainly end you up in Siberia if not in the same camp you were a jailor in.
Now don't get me wrong by making this parallel but I can vividly remember the first deer I shot. This was a large living mammal which was something completely different from the rabbits and pheasants I'was used to. It took me quite some time, excitement, fear, awe, heartbeats and whatever to finally pull the trigger. That was some dozen deer ago, now I can't wait to go out and shoot me another one. And this was "only" a deer, but I believe the same could be said for those in the camps. Lets not forget the situations and the times this happened in AND not forget that it were not the normal soldiers that guarded and jailored(?) the camps. But as I said don't get me wrong!
My niece flew to Faro, Portugal on holidays several years back. In the plane she had a conversation (the flight took no more than a few hours from Netherands) with a guy, trying to impress her with sturies, showing her some scars etc etc. All of a sudden the plane fell literally from the sky (windshear/windfall??) above the Faro airfield. This guy literally climbed over my niece, hitting her and kicking her in the head on his way out.
I agree totally (by the way Rutger Hauer is Dutch too, I said kinda proudly)
Reply to
Mechanical Menace
In the contest of the Flanders Modelling Festival (IPMS Antwerp/Belgium), there was a small concentration camp diorama. I was impressed by it and the courage of the builder.
Some photos can be found here:
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Or more specifically:
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Rob
My models:
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Me 163B site:
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AQM-34 site:
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Reply to
Rob de Bie
Welcome to the world of killfile idiot
Reply to
Andrew
Great post !
Reply to
veritas

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