Mr Surfacer

Just bought a bottle of Mr Surfacer 1000 but the label is in Japanese.
Can anyone tell me what to thin it down with?
Reply to
yman66
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Hi
Lacquer Thinner.
That's it :)
Allan
Reply to
AM
I dunno what Gunze Sangyo recommend, but I personally use laquer thinner. Seems to work quite well.
RobG
Reply to
Rob Grinberg
I am not certain it is the same....but I thin "Mr. Surfacer 500" with plain old, cheap Isopropyl Alcohol.
Reply to
Greg Heilers
WoW !!! I am surprised that it works !
It is DEFINITELY Lacquer Thinner that is the solvent here.
I actually thin Mr. Surfacer 500 down with lacquer thinner to whatever consistency I need. That said 100 is finer grained and easier to use. Though you can get 500 very close.
I still am surprised that isopropyl alcohol actually works ! Whooda thunk it.........................
Allan
Only A Gentleman Can Insult Me And A True Gentleman Never Will
Reply to
AM
A couple of caveats: I have not tried airbrushing it thinned as such; so I don't know if there are any "gotchas" there. And it *must* be Isopropyl alcohol. I had a bottle of Ethyl alcohol (accidently purchased I guess, as until I read the label, I was even unaware it was sold along side Isopropyl...); and the Ethyl alcohol just creates a *goo*....lol.
And, as I said...I have only used "500". I do not know if the others act differently.
Reply to
Greg Heilers
You can thin it with alcohol or lacquer thinner but the best thinner I've found is Mr. Color Thinner. It's not as hot as lacquer thinner and I don't spray "cobwebs" and it's quicker and more predictable than alcohol which sometimes causing clumps.
And I might add that you only have to thin it enough to shoot. Over-thinned it does not cover well and may run. Done correctly, it may look too thick on the model but it draws down tight and does not obscure detail. It's great stuff, especially if you are doing natural metal with Alclad.
MB
Reply to
Milton Bell
I have all "grades" of Mr. Surfacer, and apply with a brush. I have a bottle of Mr. Color thinner, which appears to be lacquer based, all well and fine, except that I have never had any need to thin any of the Mr. Surfacer products. When I ordered the Mr. Surfacer, the company in Japan recommended Mr. Color...not knowing any better I got a bottle and have never used a drop. My understanding is that one simply "mops" a rather thick coat as necessary, then sand off any excess leaving a flawless surface. It's the best stuff I've found for "proofing" my surfaces prior to priming. HTH, Bruce
Reply to
Bruce Apple
I'm curious about something. I have seen Mr. Surfacer 500 and 1000 mentioned for some time. Now my local purveyor of plastic has a jar of Mr. Surfacer 1200 in the shelf. How many grades of this product are there and is there any guide for their application??
Bill Shuey
Reply to
William H. Shuey
I think just three grades, the 500, 1000, and 1200. There is a good guide on usage here:
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Dave
Reply to
Dave Williams
It doesn't have to be sanded off. Dampen a rag with denatured alcohol and rub the excess Mr. Surfacer off with that. No loss of detail whatsoever.
Reply to
Al Superczynski

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