Re: Tech Question



Some folks have adapted the pedal control from sewing machines for speed control. I bought A speed control at my lhs a couple years ago, I still end up using sanding sticks, paper,whatever, more than my dremel for sanding. Grinding attachments work ok, just have to use very light touch and buy a flex shaft for better control.
-- Chuck Ryan Springfield OH

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snipped-for-privacy@kdbanglia.com says...

Dremel = 125-150w for the 220-230v version, depending on the model...
A basic dimmer switch will not work, since the Dremel's electronics regulate speed by varying power supply cycle duration, not voltage. Since that's also how these switches work, the two interfere with each other.
You should look in specialized electronics shops either for a speed regulator for thyristor-driven electrical motors, or a very basic, rheostat-based device that can vary the output voltage, not the cycle duration.
Or get a Proxxon motor tool...
--
-sdg

"Un gromono, mon royaume pour un gromono!"
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Serge D. Grun wrote:

From what I read of the original poster's post, he has a fixed speed drill with no duty-cycle electronics, a principle which lighting dimmers work on and your last paragraph is stating that the Dremel works on duty-cycle also.
Depending on the motor type it could be possible to take out the electronics and replace it with a thyristor circuit.
<http://www.play-hookey.com/semiconductors/diac_triac.html

Richard.
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says...

motor tool

cut or sand

tool will

as I turn it

power output of

power usage,

the model...

electronics

voltage.

interfere with each

a speed

basic,

the cycle

Dremel makes a speed regulator. Why reinvent the wheel? And risk damaging your tool?
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The simplest, easiest, and cheapest is to buy a sewing machine foot pedal rheostat. New about $15 -$20 .. used about $2.00. The motor is a DC (or actually a "universal" motor. Works just fine on my variable speed Dremel. Gives a great deal of speed control and even more important, the ability to control speed with your foot .. giving you one hand for the work and one for the tool. Far more convenient.
Boris
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Second that; I've use a foot pedal that was intended for sewing machine usage for years now. Excellent results, and no damage to the tool. Invest in one!!
---Stephen Tontoni Seattle, WA
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This is what you need...... The Dremel #221 Foot Speed Control
http://dremel.com/HTML/home_fr.html
--
Scott A. Bregi

"Imagination is more important than knowledge" Albert Einstein
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OK,
Sounds like the foot pedal might be the easiest, best way to go. I should clarify the situation though, I have a Craftsman brand two speed "Dremmel" style motor tool. I do have a flex shaft for it, but I find it hard to work with. I tend to clamp the tool to my workbench and use two hands to hold my parts. The dimmer switch I used on my first try was rated for 600 watts. I could not find anything on the tool that indicated amps, watts, or anything else. I buy Dremmel parts and attachments for the tool, but I did not know there was a foot pedal available.
Thanks
Zack

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