Thinner question

I recently read a review of model build where the author said he used a
thinner called "white spirit" to apply a wash and highlight recessed
features on the model. Does anyone know for sure what this "white spirit"
thinner is? I have been told it may have been lighter fluid. Oil paints were
used in the wash.
Reply to
blueleader
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If you are in the USA then it is sold as mineral spirits. White spirits is the British name for the same thing. It is most definitely not lighter fluid.
Anders "blueleader" skrev i meddelandet news:m2ZFc.2771$r3.87@okepread03...
Reply to
Anders
My chance to get back on the 'Finish' situation.
Its easy - walk into any hardware store in the UK and ask for White Spirit and it will be available at about £1 per bottle.
Now the trick is to find out the US name...
Grin.
Actually, I have no idea what it actually is - I have just bought 'White Spirit' for years. I have a suspicion it is a diluted turps but I am probably wrong. David Pennington snipped-for-privacy@bbbweb.com
Reply to
David Pennington
White Spirit is an English term. I believe Odorless Paint Thinner or Mineral Spirits is a viable US replacement. Don't use turpintine as the vapors can be carcinogenic.
Don't use denatured alcohol as it is denatured with acetone in the US which will dissolve and ruin the underlying paint job.
Jim Klein
Reply to
West Coast Engineering
"White Spirit" is either an American indian name (ha ha) or drycleaning fluid if I remember correctly. In the UK, it is often a name for "Shellite", which is "petroleum spirits" (Gasoline in your parlance) that is clear white and without additives such as anti-knock, oil, artificial colour or flavour etc. Although this may dissolve some paints, I suspect it isn't what you need. Oh, yes it is also the principal ingredient of lighter fluid. The drycleaning type of white spirit is an alcohol or ketone based product and far more suitable to thinning acryllic model paints.
Reply to
Norman Lever
It's a not too "hot" enamel thinner (think it's also called "turpenoid", not turpentine), however more or less is odorless paint thinner. I use Humbrol thinner for enamel washes and think it's more or less the same thing.
Of course you can use it for an enamel (or oil) wash as long as you painted the model with acrylic paint (or sprayed an acrylic overcoat). Stronger thinners (such as Testors or turpentine) may dissolve also underlying acrylic paints.
My 0.02
Reply to
Yuri
White spirit is this stuff:
White spirit is a clear colourless solvent with very low water solubility and a characteristic odour (odour threshold: 0.5-5 mg/m3). The most common variety of white spirit is a mixture of saturated aliphatic and alicyclic C7-C12 hydrocarbons with a content of 15-20% (by weight) of aromatic C7-C12 hydrocarbons and a boiling range of 130-230°C. The C9-C11 hydrocarbons (aliphatics, alicyclics and aromatics) are most abundant, constituting > 80% (by weight) of the total. This ordinary white spirit is designated white spirit, type 1, regular grade, as three different types and three different grades exist. The type refers to whether the solvent has been subjected to hydrodesulfurization (removal of sulfur) alone (type 1), solvent extraction (type 2) or hydrogenation (type 3). The hydrodesulfurized type contains less than 25% aromatic hydrocarbons, the solvent-extracted less than 5%, and the hydrogenated less than 1%. Each type comprises three different grades: low flash grade (flash point: 21-30°C; initial boiling point: 130-144°C), regular grade (flash point: 31-54°C; initial boiling point: 145-174°C), and high flash grade (flash point: > 55°C; initial boiling point: 175-200°C). The grade is determined by the crude oil used as the starting material and the conditions of distillation. Type 0 white spirit is defined as a distillation fraction with no further treatment, consisting predominantly of saturated C9-C12 hydrocarbons with a boiling range of 140-220°C. The low flash grade possesses the highest vapour pressure of approximately 1.4 kPa (10.5 mmHg) at 20° C.
A USA variety of type 1 is called Stoddard solvent and is a petroleum distillate defined according to its boiling range of 149-204°C and the absence of rancid or objectionable odours. [...]
I _strongly_ suggest that you DO NOT attempt to dry clean clothes with that...
Reply to
Serge D. Grun
Lighter fluid is Naphta. It can be purchased in paint stores as it is used as a paint solvent. I do agree with other posters that White Spitit is a British term.
I personally use Naphta as a cleaner/degreaser for plasic. It does nto harm styrene in short term contact but if you dunk it for a while it might do some damage. Always test new methods on scrap pieces ...
I have also used Naphta to thin Testors Pla Enamel paints.
Someone else posted thread stating that Denatured Alcohol has Acetone. I don't think that is true. Something else makes Denatured Alcohol poisonous - not sure - it is methanol or something liek that.
Peteski
Reply to
Peter W.
Lighter fluid is Naphta. It can be purchased in paint stores as it is used as a paint solvent. I do agree with other posters that White Spitit is a British term.
I personally use Naphta as a cleaner/degreaser for plasic. It does nto harm styrene in short term contact but if you dunk it for a while it might do some damage. Always test new methods on scrap pieces ...
I have also used Naphta to thin Testors Pla Enamel paints.
Someone else posted thread stating that Denatured Alcohol has Acetone. I don't think that is true. Something else makes Denatured Alcohol poisonous - not sure - it is methanol or ethanol or something similar.
If it was Acetone then it would evaporate much quicker than the alcohol. You could leave the bottle open for a while and you would end up with a plain alcohol.
Peteski
Reply to
Peter W.
In the time I worked at an oil production company we sold "wasbenzine" under different names in different countries. Wasbenzine = Dutch Naphta = I think was American White spirit = British Waschbenzin = German
I use it all the time for cleaning/degreasing models and thinning enamels.
The stuff sold in Holland as called "Thinner" will definetely eat your models away.
Dennis Loep The Glueing Dutchman
"The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not 'Eureka!' but 'That's funny ...'" Isaac Asimov
Reply to
Dennis Loep
Look for VM&P naphtha in hardware stores, faster dry but the cure is just as long as with mineral spirits (AKA- odorless mineral spirits, aliphatic mineral spirits, Stoddard Solvent, Varsol).
Pretty much spot on there, just don't try it on clear as it can fog.
If you buy the stuff for thinning shellac at a hardware store it is methanol as you suppose and not acetone.
Reply to
Ron
100% wrong, gasoline is from a different part of the crack for crude oil. Try aliphatic mineral spirits.
If you're using gasoline it will dissolve most styrenes.
Again 100% wrong, lighter fluid is naphtha which is the aromatic side of the crack that aliphatic minerals spirits comes from.
Neither, it used to be carbontetrachloride but has been changed, what I do remember it that dry cleaning solution is NOT a ketone or alcohol. Whatever they use now it is still chlorinated.
Reply to
Ron
Probably lacquer thinner then.
Reply to
Ron
Methanol is known colloquially as Wood Alchohol. It is poisonous to the point of rendering one who drinks it blind. Used in bathtub gin etc. during prohibition in the US it is the reason for the term "blind drunk." It's usually sold as Shellac thinner and is great for most Acrylic paints however you'll need a respirator whilst spraying etc. hth
The Keeper (of too much crap)
Reply to
Keeper
Ronsonol (brand name for that lighter fluid in the yellow squeeze bottle), is a perfect solvent for removing SNJ if you make a mistake and have to redo it. I don't happen to use it for anything else (don't have functioning lighters anymore).
Mark Schynert
Reply to
Mark Schynert

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