(WTD) Info On Bataan Death March...

I'm looking for some info on this, after reading the book "Ghost
Soldiers", accounting the raid on the Cabanatuan prison camp. I did a
Google search and found references of three soldiers who escaped during
the Death March timeframe. One of these men was named Mellnick (sorry
for the timing on this re: our pesty poster) who was listed as hailing
from my hometown of Dunmore, PA. I've never heard of him before this.
The father of one of my friends was a participant in the March though
he doesn't recall Mr. Mellnick. Anyone have anything on this?
Thanks for any help you can offer.
Frank Kranick
Reply to
Francis X. Kranick, Jr.
Loading thread data ...
Like Father like son! Who do you think I am? Santa Claus!
Melnick \\\\\\\\\
Reply to
Mr.Melnick
Um, no, Dennis. Just a fraud and a poser with no life other than the keyboard in front of you... Kinda pathetic.
Frank Kranick
Reply to
Francis X. Kranick, Jr.
If I was still interested, I'd have one of my researchers pull ol' Dennis Melnick's military records next time he goes to the National Records Center in St Louis just to see what's in there (assuming he even has a military record at all) but, it's already quite clear he's a faker and I really don't care anymore.
"The world would be a much simpler place if every one could pick and choose their obligations, but we can't and we shouldn't." Major Charles W. Whittlesey
Reply to
Bill Woodier
Being that I was born in 1945, all I have is admiration for the brave souls who lived and died in the Batan Death March. My dad was USAAF during that dreadful time and was lucky enough to survive WWII.
It really does not matter what became of the survivors of the Batan Dearth March after they were liberated. Their deeds in the PI speak for themselves. Survival in a Jap Prison is a badge of honor all its own.
The beasts that forced them to march, have written their own history and have paid their individual prices, or will. I'm sure there is a hot and sufurious place for those who escaped the war crime trials.
Now PLEASE, lets get back to modeling. The models we build, honor not our ability to build, they honor the brave people who offered their very lives to keep the world free from the AXIS powers.
Jim Klein
Reply to
West Coast Engineering
Francis X Kramit, man I forget what a dillweed you is!
Lighten up, Francis!
Reply to
Jim Nasium
Go get em Chaswick!
Reply to
Jim Nasium
West Coast Engineering wrote in message news:...
...so how come everyone and his dog are manifacturing/building/detailing/referencing the sodding Luftwaffe? (Not trolling, only a Russian aircraft fan with a chip on her shoulder...)
Ciao Bonehammer
Reply to
Bonehammer
message news:...
They represent what the Spitfire, P-47, P-51 and P-38 destroyed. Besides, the bad guys always have neater paint schemes and cooler marking, until the paint blisters off and the aluminum melts.
Jim Klein
Reply to
West Coast Engineering
Actually he spewed nothing worth propagating.....looks like the festering syphilis chancre of Arizona has changed his "name" again. Enjoy a quick trip to the killfile.
Reply to
Ron
Misplaced mystique probably accounts for it, as far as the builders/buyers are concerned; the manufacturers simply supply the demand. German aircraft seem to be considered far superior to their contemporaries, though most Luftwaffe successes throughout the war could be traced to better tactics and larger numbers of modern aircraft available. There was very little to choose in 1939-40 between a Bf 109 and a Spitfire, or even a Bf 109 and a D.520C. The Me 262 was a devastating anti-bomber fighter against the older-generation B-17 and B-24, but it would have had a tough time engaging the B-29 effectively. Of course, it isn't just German aircraft. German armor is probably a more popular subject than any other armor from WWII, probably for the same reasons.
I model Luftwaffe equipment about as frequently as RAF, US air arms and Soviet, because my primary focus is on WWII airframes I find especially interesting as flying machines, irrespective of markings. Sometimes the markings make work on a particular model more interesting to me, though. For example, I have a set of Swiss markings for the Bf 109E, which makes it a lot more likely I'll build that kit. OTOH, of the 38 built-ups I have on display, four display the hakenkruez ( three Luftwaffe and one DLH). Certainly there are a lot of cool-looking German aircraft (and I'm only talking about the ones that flew--Luft '46 isn't my cup of tea at all), but I look at the British, Japanese, Italian and American types and see a lot of cool alternatives too.
Mark Schynert
Reply to
Mark Schynert
I'd like to share with you the story another guy who went through this terrible ordeal but his story doesn't end there. I just spoke with several wonderful members of his family a couple weeks ago at our POW/MIA Family Conference here in DC. William McClung entered the Marines in the mids 30s (I have the exact date somewhere but it's just not available to me at the moment). After a short period of time in the States, he volunteered to serve with the China Marines and spent about 4 years there. He returned to the States for a short period but, in early 1941, before volunteering for overseas duty again and was posted to the Marine Det, on Corrigador. He was there on 7 December when Pearl Harbor was bombed and was there to meet the Japanese attackds on Bataan and Corrigador.
He ended up being knocked unconscious at his gun position, was captured, and was part of the death march. However, he was one of the lucky ones as he survived the death march and some four years as a POW. After liberation at the end of WW-II, he returned to the States but that's definitely not the end of Bill McClung's story.
After a short period of R&R, he joined the1st Marine Division. He deployed with the 1st Marine Division to meet the North Korean invasion at Pusan and, by this time a Master Sergeant, hje and the rest of the Marine composit unit at Pusan were pulled out to be part of the 1MarDiv invasion force that landed at Inch-on. He fought his way from Inch-on through Seoul; they cut off the retreat of the North Korean Army and basically destroyed what was left of it in South Korea. He was with the 1st MarDiv when it was pulled off the line and put on ships for Operation Yo-Yo, before finally landing at the North Korean port of Hungnam and moving up to the town of Hagaru-ri at the base of the Chosin Reservoir. While the 5th and 7th Marines moved up to Yudam-ni on the wast side of the Reservoir on 27 November, MSGT Bill McClung had what seemed to ba a pretty soft job with Headquarters Company (which remained at Hagaru-ri). What they didn't know was that almost 200,000 Chinese troops had infiltrated south and were about to spring a trep. On the night of 27-28 November, the Chinese hit the Mrines at Yudam-ni and the Army Task Force on the east side of the Reservoir. At almost the same time, they slammed into Hagaru-ri.
The fighting was furious and by 1December buth the Marines and the Army Task force made a fighting withdrawal back to Hagaru-ri where they reorganized and, on 6 december, began to withdraw south to Koto-ri and the port of Hamhung-Hungnam for evacuation. the problem was that several Deivisions of Chinese had swarmed past Hagaru-ri and took up positions on the high ground on both sides of the MSR. The convoy had to fight every inch south to Koto-ri where they regrouped again before the final puch to the port.
About halfway between Hagaru-ri and Koto-ri was a wide spot in the road that became known as Hellfire Valley. There, the Chinese established several large roadblocks which caused the column to stop and become segmented. Once the convoy was halted, the Chinese swarmed down the hills and all over the trucks of wounded and dead. MSGT Bill McClung, took charge of a small group of Marines around a truck and organized them into a defense from which they held off several Chinese attacks. When the convoy began to move again, he began loading wounded onto the trucks when the Chinese hit again. He turned, alone to face them and killed several before he fell, mortally wounded. He was later awarded a posthumous the Navy Cross for his valor.
The end of the story is almost too sad to tell. Once he fell, some of the Marines on the truck, retrieved his body and put it on one of the trucks and they made it to Koto-ri. There, the Marines dug a field cemetery and some 150 Marines and soldiers, including MSGT McClung, were buried there. His body was never returned and is, to this day, unaccounted for (and that is how I came to meet his family).
Semper fi.................Bill
"The world would be a much simpler place if every one could pick and choose their obligations, but we can't and we shouldn't." Major Charles W. Whittlesey
Reply to
Bill Woodier
semper fi
Jim Klein USNR-R
Reply to
West Coast Engineering
You poor thing! How'd you like to be a Fleet Air Arm fan? I think we'll get a 1/48 Fulmar once every plane ever planned by the Luftwaffe has been kitted twice.
Reply to
Tom Cervo
yea, and what about a fruitbat in any scale? (i know the one shot down by the drunk in the walrus that thought it was a seagull wasn't strictly faa, but for the diorama.....)
Reply to
e

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.