Future Version - How to determine which one?

Hello,
I've recently inherited a few dozen solidworks files. I'm using SW
2003 and when I go to open the files it says "Future Version." I'm
assuming that means....future version, so how do I figure out which
one? I can possibly get my hands on 2004 and 2005, does it matter
which one I use? Also, in the same folder are a ton of files of type
"certificate trust list." What does that mean, it sounds important.
Thanks for any help, -Todd
Reply to
Todd.J.Olson
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Easiest way is to look at the properties of the SWx files and see when they were created....That should give you an idea of the version that created it. Chances are though that if you get the SWx 2005, it'll open them up. Just remember, you'll have to use that version for any editing as you know you can't save them as a previous version....
Scott
Reply to
IYM
Actually it does...If he has 2003, and the files were created using 2005, then upgrading to 2004 and attempting to open the files will yield him the same "future version" results....
Scott
Reply to
IYM
a écrit dans le message de news: snipped-for-privacy@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
No it does not. Get the most recent you can. You can also download the SolidWorks Viewer
formatting link
HIH JM
Reply to
Jean Marc
Will 2005 open everything before it? 2004 is easy for me to get a copy of, 2005 might take some work. Thanks for the link, -Todd
Reply to
Todd.J.Olson
The ""certificate trust list" files are probably stereolithography (.STL) files. For some reason Windows gives them this description. You should be able to import them into SolidWorks.
Reply to
Dan
It is a long shot, but try TSToolbox. You can find it at
formatting link
Reply to
TOP
a écrit dans le message de news: snipped-for-privacy@g49g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
Yes
Reply to
Jean Marc
How will looking at the file properties tell you what version of SW created it? I see no reference in the prop's that will tell you what version created it. Only when it was created.. . 2003 will still create files long after 2006 is dead and buried... ;)
jb..
Reply to
jb
Looking a file's properties will NOT provide any useful information about the version of SolidWorks used to create it.
For example you could have an old legacy SolidWorks 1996 file that was copied from one drive to another. The copy will show the date it was written to disk so, if that were done today the date would show as a creation of November 18, 2005. With the date as a basis would one assume that it must have been created by SolidWorks 2005?
If the file is read into a HEX Editor, then its contents can be viewed as pages of symbols and some legible text. By scrolling through or searching for text strings, it is possible to find references to SolidWorks which can be used to help identify the version. This can be helpful, but not necessarily definitive...
NOTE: Obviously, you don't want to modify and save a file that's been viewed in the HEX Editor program!
Per O. Hoel
Reply to
POH
"POH" wrote in news:1132327278.586740.219250 @g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
That's the best Idea so far.
In fact simply use notepad. (use small files or a better text editor)
Obviously there will be a lot of gobbledy-gook but there is also ledgable text. (The text is double spaced for some reason) The good news is that the version (number) is readable and near the top of the file, the bad news is how to make sense of it. Here are some samples.
From a 2000 version: "M O _ V E R S I O N _ 1 5 0 0"
From a 2003 version: "M O _ V E R S I O N _ 2 2 0 0"
From a 2004 version: "M O _ V E R S I O N _ 2 5 0 0"
From a 2005 version: "M O _ V E R S I O N _ 2 8 0 0"
From a 2006 version: "M O _ V E R S I O N _ 3 1 0 0"
I can not comment on whether "Service Pack" version has any bearing on the version informtion.
Autocad version, for example can be revieled in the same manner. Example: "AC1012"
I bet anyone here a doughnut that every cad package will yield the version informtion in the same manner. After all, How else would an older version of the software read a newer version file which it can't open?
AND, OF COURSE - OBVIOUSLY - Do not edit and do not save.
cheers
brian
Reply to
BWelch
I didn't say it was an fool proof way, but it will give you an idea. *Most* companies currently using SWx are on teh subscription plan which means that *usually* they are running the current or latest SP of the previous version. So chances are that if the last modified date in the file properties is 2-3-04, that the file most likely saved as a SWx 2003 or 2004 version.
Reply to
IYM

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