Really, really slow detail views in drawings.

We have a user making drawings of a moderately large assembly.
3 sheets, not shaded.
On the third sheet he dropped in a view from another assembly and
broke it. Three break lines.
The following happened after he left his computer on all night:
ANY screen activity would cause 100% CPU for an extended time (5 min.)
Cleaning out temp and rebooting helped considerably, but it is still
slow.
Changing line font to thin didn't help.
Setting image quality sliders to low didn't help.
Dragging the Task Manager window over the SW window is like dragging
an eraser, it wipes out all the graphics till the SW window can finish
redrawing.
This is a fairly good system:
Dell 3.2 GHz, 2GB, NVidia FX3000, XP XP1, SW 2004 SP4.1
Reply to
P
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Wasn't this a problems with one of the first Sp's in 2004, that when You added a few sheets the whole thing choked, and something about draft quality was slower then high quality when You added broken views.
Krister L
Reply to
Krister L
Krister,
Something rings a bell there. I am trying to get the guy to work in shaded mode. That will help a little. But on these assemblies we have to have details, lots of details, and it kills us on performance especially when we drag one to a new sheet.
Reply to
P
Yes I remember this problem...but wasn't it solved in a later Sp. I guess an upgrade to Sp 4.2 is not an option...otherwise You probably would have done it already.
Krister L
"P" skrev i meddelandet news: snipped-for-privacy@posting.google.com...
Reply to
Krister L
We are all on SW2004 SP4.2. Still too slow. Sometimes it takes 5-10 minutes or more to load a drawing. It really messes with our work flow because it is at the end of the drawing process that many little changes come. On a paper drawing the change would be easy, but on SW it takes a long time for each change on each sheet.
Reply to
P
Do you use a single .SLDDRW file for an assembly and all its details, or does each detail get its own file?
Reply to
Dale Dunn
Ahh sorry ....I read SW2004 Sp in your first post....sometimes my glasses play games with me
Krister L
"P" skrev i meddelandet news: snipped-for-privacy@posting.google.com...
Reply to
Krister L
Typically the details would be on separate sheets in one .slddrw file. Might this be a tip you are giving?
Reply to
P
I've recently proven out a long-held suspicion that breaking a drawing set into smaller files really helps with load/save time and general responsiveness. The trick was to break out of the mindset of one file per drawing. Ironically the opportunity to try this came with a customer with stringent requirements on 2d .dwg deliverables. Breaking the drawing set into multiple files was part of the most pracical way to attack the problem. Fortunatley, I also remember how to do ACAD scripts (not that they're complicated in any way).
There are drawbacks of course. Exporting can be a real pain for large numbers of sheets. Of course, there are macros that can help with that. Also, propagating custom property changes across all those files can be a problem. Again, macros should be able to help. I haven't crossed that bridge yet myself. We're just on the verge of making the organisational changes to make this really work. I really can't make any recommendations on macros to use yet.
I also haven't yet worked out a good method for cloning an assembly and all the drawing files associated with it and its component parts.
Any comments from those with the wisdom to have gone before will be appreciated. Here's what we're getting ready to do:
-Every made or altered part gets its own drawing and drawing number, instead of one drawing and number per assembly. We'll have simple sequential numbers with blocks assigned to each designer. I wonder how fast I'm going to go through the first 99,999 numbers. -Obviously, each part now has its own revision level instead of several dozen parts sharing a revision level on one drawing. -I'm looking at adding the part number to the model file names, but I'm not sure how that will pan out. Our procedures don't require it, but it would be good insurance if it's not too much hassle.
That's right, we were doing it all the hard way. It has been taking a long time to shake off the habits left over from paper drawings, and we've always been a CAD shop!
Reply to
Dale Dunn

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