SolidWorks World - What Would "Make" you Attend?

Hello Everyone,
As you are aware, the SolidWorks World Conference is fast approaching. I am
looking forward to the conference returning to it's glory days - the venue,
the duration, the number of great sessions, and the terrific activities.
Historically, the conference is attended by a very small percentage of
SolidWorks users, and I would really like to know why. I realize that
economic issues can be a restriction, as well as the time spent away from
the office. But even taking these things into account, please consider the
following questions:
If you've never attended, what are the reasons? What would make SolidWorks
World a "must attend" event for you.
For those of you that have been to one (or more) of the conferences, what
more would you like to see? What would make SolidWorks World a no-brainer to
attend. Is there one thing (and hey, go off the deep end here if you like)
that you really think would make it very special?
Thanks everyone. SolidWorks is listening to this thread carefully. I am
confident that this group can come up with some wonderful ideas, and even if
they don't happen this year - perhaps we'll see some of our wishes in the
future. You may respond here for all to see, or if you would rather reply to
me personally, please do not hesitate.
Richard Doyle
SWUGN - Southern Region Rep
Reply to
Richard Doyle
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"Richard Doyle" wrote in news:2snlgiF1n8103U1@uni- berlin.de:
How about an insuffrable tightwad employer?
Reply to
xxx
I would require some obvious benefit to my employer, such as job leads, guarantee of productity increase, etc. Notice, I said "obvious" benefit. Otherwise, it looks like a junket. It might actually be easier to attend in North Dakota.
Reply to
Dale Dunn
I would love to attend but financial/time restrictions are very real.... :(
Reply to
Zander
Anytime a confrence is held at a location with "Resort" in the name, it will be hard to convence managers to go. I think a 'Motel 6' in North Dakota would easier to stomach :) Not to mention probably as fun if not funner than a Disney theme park... CJ
Reply to
Craig
Zander, I agree - time=money, and money spent on "training" usually counts against the bottom line. But have you ever tried making a business case for attending? Would your employer consider productivity gains money well spent. How about yourself personally, would you consider a compromise - burn a couple of vacation days in exchange for the company footing the fees? Would the opportunity to attend the conference (especially the sessions and the exhibits) be worth that to you?
And I have to ask again - taking in to account the money and the time, is there ANYTHING that would make your employer say "Fill out a req, because you have to attend this conference"
I haven't considered if perhaps you are an independant. If so, are conferences like these a good place to make contacts and pick up some work?
Richard
Reply to
Richard Doyle
Dale, I think you can make the case that your productivity will improve. Take a look at all of the sessions offered (a really good look), and maybe you'll find something that could result in even a 2% increase in productivity. Over a years time, that translates into money - maybe not enough to cover all of the costs, but it certainly comes close.
As far as picking up job leads, I've gotten several over the years. They don't all pan out, but some of them do. Plenty of the attendees (and even some of the exhibitors) are in a position to at least talk to you about it, and after all, isn't networking one of the ways we can get some business?
Nothing in business is 100%. And yes, Disney World is a tough sell. But presented in a business like manner, with some data to back it up, just might get you there.
Richard
Reply to
Richard Doyle
What if I already know everything? har har.
Reply to
Dale Dunn
I was actually going to mention that in my original reply. Maybe the SolidWorks sessions aren't as beneficial to long-time users as they are to new users. But if you look at the session schedule, you'll see that there are more than just CAD sessions offered. There are opportunities for learning about add-on or partner products as well. Maybe not a direct increase in your own productivity, but perhaps a tool that could be useful to the company. The exhibits offer a uinique opportunity as well, the chance to see many products/services in one shot. Most of the booths are manned by people that really know the products, can answer very technical questions, and are very knowledable about the industry.
I also talk to a lot of users that tell me "The company will never pay for it". When pressed, some will admit that they don't even ask. Geez, by all means ASK. What could it hurt.
Richard
Reply to
Richard Doyle
If you cant convince yourself of the cost-benefit how are you suppose to convince your boss? If you take 4-days away from work (even assuming you dont take any vacation in the year) you have already lost over 1% in your productivity that you have to overcome. Not to mention lost oppuntunity cost. Now tack on fees, airfare, hotel (Resort), car rental, food...
Sorry, now I would look like an idot to my boss...which is also a cost :)
CJ
Reply to
Craig
Honestly, I've looked at the list of sessions, and I'd love to go to a lot of them. Even the stuff I think I'm strong on. It never fails that there's something I'm missing.
What I really want to get in on is the round table discussions. i think that would be an excellent place to discuss SW with the people who make it.
Reply to
Dale Dunn
Okay Craig, you win. I won't be trying to convince anyone to go to the conference anymore. But I will go back to my original question (slightly revised):
Is there ANYTHING that would make SolidWorks World worth attending?
Richard
Reply to
Richard Doyle
The roundtables are great. Funny though, I've attended several and each time I walk out with more issues than when I walked in. Most attendees bring a top ten list to the discussions. As we go around the room reading them off you can see people scratching notes, and every now and then someone will say "Hey, you're right, that is a problem".
Honestly, some really good discussion takes place in the roundtables. And they aren't the only place to talk with the folks at SolidWorks. Everyone of them is very accesible during the conference, and they are genuinely interested in hearing from us.
Reply to
Richard Doyle
Many companies offer tuition reimbursement. That was how I was able to go last year. Going to SWW is just like being a CSWP, I negotiate it at hire/review time.
Matthew A. Bush
Reply to
Matthew A. Bush
Richard,
The first thing that I see is the extremely large cost to get in the door. I am used to attending many machine tool trade shows and kind of see this as similar. I always get free tickets for myself and all my three employees. But, then, if we had to pay - the price is only $35. Nobody I know would consider spending the amount required to get into SWW. You can call me cheap if you want to - but I'm not. The hugh price actually makes me somwhat angry just to see it in print!
Sincerely. Jerry Forcier
Richard Doyle wrote:
Reply to
Jerry Forcier
I know that. They had one in Vegas just a few years ago. That's the closest they ever got to the west coast, and probably ever will. I was unable to go for several reasons.
Mark
Reply to
MM
What precisely is the purpose for going to such an event? The obvious reason to me is seeing some extra "tricks" that would make my job "a little easier." The company I work at has four full time designers that use solidworks and we also do quite a variety of machine building. From turbopumps for rockets to small power plant design. The pace is impressive and small tricks don't affect much. We are in Denver where the conference never is and never should be looking at the number of dwindling mechanical companies out here... So there is a guarantee that I would be spending money on airfare, tickets, and hotel and maybe even a rental car. I would love to see the bloated corporate pig of a company that can afford all of these for a few tricks and not to mention that I can post stuff on the newsgroup and gleen the information that way?! Maybe I am way way off base but it doesn't seem to me that it requires a "tightwad" employer just an intelligent budgeteer. Please list the benefits of going to solidworks world if I am understating them.
Reply to
Paul Youtsey
Free attendance..... I won't pay for dog's & pony's.
Reply to
Malcolm_Tempt
It's a "Glamified" dog & pony for SWX and the partners.
Corporate is laughing all the way to the bank.
Reply to
Malcolm_Tempt
Yes, make it free to all "valid license wielding" SWX owners/users. Malcontent
Reply to
Malcolm_Tempt

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