Using Polytrans from Okino to import Meshes to SW

Our office is converting part of our design process to SW. However,
we have an extensive collection of 3D drawings which use polyface
meshes to represent objects (Created in AutoCAD). I am looking for a
convenient way to get these into SW.
I have an older version of Okino's Polytrans software, and had some
success with it, though it did have some problems. I am wondering if
the new version is able to do better. I also know they have a special
module just for SW which I've not used.
Anyone here have any experience with this particular software and
converting meshes for SW?
Joe Dunfee
Reply to
cadcoke3
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Polymeshes are approximations. The result of a polymesh to NURBS conversion is an approximation of an approximation.
I would have a service bureau do some conversions first to see if it's even worth it. If the models are prismatic, or mechanical in nature, It's definately not worth the trouble.
Mark
Reply to
MM
I have beem using Polytrans for awhile now. Frankly, I have never had any luck doing what you suggest. Depending on what the objects are, you may be better off going the Geomagics route. I think you will be nothing but frustrated trying to convert them any other way. I can give you the name of a vendor that uses Geomagic if you'd like. They may be able to help you.
Mike Tripoli
Reply to
Mike Tripoli
Can you tell me more detail about this approximation. I realize polyface meshes cannot accurately represent curves. However, the items I trying to translate are almost all representing square tubing. Is the issue the number of decimal places the coordinates is saved at?
Aside from the square tubing, about 5% of the drawings I would like to translate are things like theatrical lighting fixtures, trees, and people. For these, the appoximations are acceptable.
Joe Dunfee
Reply to
cadcoke3
Joe,
It's mostly the fact that you'll end up with a bunch of dumb, poor performing models at best. Poor performance of imported data is direcly related it's relative accuracy. You'll find that even if the model is just a simple box, the walls won't be flat or perpendicular. On top of this, it'll just be a dumb blob. SW seems to treat all surfaces and faces as "potential" solid elements. Because of this, it performs better with highly accurate data. Poorly or inacurately defined geometry bring Parasolids "tolerant" algorithims into play. This is a burden to the CPU.
I can model a piece of square tubing in about 15 seconds, so can you. With configurations, this single model can represent any cross section, length, or wall thickness, with a single mouse click. You'll probably spend much more time trying to convert and import your old stuff than modeling from scratch.
The best thing to do (in my opinion) is just leave your legacy data in the original format. Use it as a reference to model SW data as needed.
Regards
Mark
Reply to
Mark Mossberg

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