Confederate layouts?



LOL :-)
Btw, to change the topic a little to be just a tiny bit more on-topic - it might have been fun to to try to model moving a division down a single track branch line with too few and too short sidings, a lack of proper turning wyes, not much in the way of spacious platforms for loading/unloading etc.
Add a few outages caused by raiders burning bridges and such like, supply officers always asking for more supplies than they needed (and then needing to move it forward or back, depending on how the battle went) and keeping the traffic flowing might became prove quite challenging :-)
Guess one pretty quickly would have had to reinvent at least some of Herman Haupt's principles (according to this web page I just found: http://www-cgsc.army.mil/carl/resources/csi/gabel4/gabel4.asp ) :
1) No military officers were to interfere in the running of trains.
2) Supplies would be sent forward only as needed.
3) Trains reaching the front were to be unloaded immediately by anyone available. Officers who refused to cooperate faced dismissal.
4) Where telegraph communications were unavailable, trains would run according to a rigid schedule. All trains departed on schedule, fully loaded or not. Extra trains would pick up the slack.
5) On lines where the absence of sidings prevented opposing trains from passing each other, convoys of five or six trains would travel as a group. Each convoy delivered its cargo and returned to base before the next convoy started out.
Grin, Stein
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Don't know if this has atready been mentioned - not interested in re-fighting the civil war (or reading about same in this forum). I have a neat book titled "Civil War Railroads" that is filled with railroad pictures and stories of the period. Author is Geo. B. Abdill and it was published by Bonanza book division of Crown Publishers. Think I got it from Publishers Clearing House but don't know if they are still around.
Dick
Stein R wrote:

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Thanks for the tip.
Stein
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Preliminary? You mean he threatened to issue it. Okay, so it's about 2.5 years into the war. A war to free the slaves and he didn't bother himself with any attempt to declare them to be free for 2.5 years after the war began.
One would have thought a war to free the slaves would have *begun* with the Union freeing them.
As for remaining on topic... I received my Confederate On30 loco and tender yesterday. It seems to be a rather cheap production, apparently manufactured by Bachmann. Far too cheap for what they (CollectablesToday.com) are charging. I'm sending it back. I wanted a relatively nice train, not a merely display piece.
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On Sun, 21 Jan 2007 03:37:28 GMT, Spender wrote:

Unh hunh. Yeah, that's the ticket.
--
Steve

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Slavery was the only states rights vs federalism issue that generated enough friction to take the problems to war.

The Cotton Gin is credited with breathing new life into the southern cotton industry and thus the slave system.
Paul^H^H^H^ Steve
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On Sun, 21 Jan 2007 22:32:45 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@steve.com (Steve Stevenson) wrote:

Yet Lincoln didn't issue The Emancipation Proclamation for nearly three years after the war had begun, and the document exempted the practice of slavery in the border states as well as parts of Confederate states that had fallen under Union control.
Read that again. Even after issuing the Emancipation Proclamation, slavery was *legal* in the border states and in area of Conderate states that were under Union control.
Slavery certainly wasn't the issue that sparked the war. It was simply became emotionally loaded Fox News banner of the day.
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Buck@ snipped-for-privacy@Cowtown.net says...

As you know by now, the Constitution makes no reference to secession. You might, however find "The Texas Ordinance Of Secession"(1861), relevant. http://www.lsjunction.com/docs/secesson.htm
fl@liner
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On Thu, 18 Jan 2007 14:02:23 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (fl@liner) wrote:

I hadn't read that before. Needless to say the NAACP would not care for many of the sentiments... Some of the statements seem to be in error. Hadn't most all other "Christian nations" made slavery illegal by then? Slavery at least in the American fashion - "involuntary servitude" existed long after some other "Christian nations" had made slavery illegal.
It does illustrate another divide in the Civil War, which was arguably more about economics than slavery. Not all Southerners, and certainly not all Southern Christians, believed slavery was right, let alone condoned by God.
Gen. Robert E. Lee never owned a slave because he believed the institution of slavery was immoral. He believed that the days of slavery as an institution were numbered. However he fought the war because he believed, as the Texas document implied (regardless of its rude assessment of black people), that the Federal government had illegally over-stepped its bounds and launched an economic war that threatened the survival of the Southern states.
France, a nation were slavery was already illegal, sided with the Confederacy for the same reason. Though economically it was in France's self-interest, and they were never able to really help the South because they were too busy getting their asses kicked by Mexico.
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On Fri, 19 Jan 2007 00:54:33 GMT, Spender wrote:

As did the wealthy political elite in England, although the working folks and a lot of the lower middle class were opposed to it.
--
Steve

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One might say that in a government of enumerated powers, the constitution doesn't prohibit it, thus it exists.
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On Thu, 9 Nov 2006 02:07:00 -0800, Steve Caple

And on what ASSumption do you base that bit of idiocy?
fl@liner This tagline has been certified to contain no political rants.
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fl@liner wrote:

Steve, your village called. Their idiot is missing. Time to go home now.
In HO scale, Mantua used to make a model of The General, along with a few freight and passenger cars. The same models were also sold by Tyco. They are long out of production. Model Power owns the molds to make these and their is hope they will release them again with some improvements. Bachmann makes a locomotive that is a little too modern for the Civil War era, and some cars as well. Associated Hobby Manufacturers (AHM) and International Hobby Corporation (IHC) (( kind of the same company)) made some stuff years ago. Musket Miniatures makes Civil War military figures, and scenery items. There is a group on Yahoo called EarlyRail. Go to Yahoo, create an account, go to Groups, and enter the name. Good Luck.
Oh yeah, Steve, is that your picture on the cover of the National Enquirer?
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The best place to start is a search of Amazon or some such book dealer. Over the years there have been at least a couple of books written specifically about modeling the Civil War era in HO. These will guide you in properly choosing and making appropriate modification to commercially available models.
Likewise, sometime around 2000 the NMRA's magazine had a series of articles regarding the accurate modeling of 1880-1900 (I think) rolling stock based on commonly available HO kits. While this is well past the Civil War era, the cars would be accurate representations of real ones, not simply fantasy, and since car design didn't change very rapidly up until WWI, few folks will be able tell the difference anyway.
I also believe MR had one or two Civil War era modeling articles about ten years ago, addressing musuem dioramas of same. Do a search of their publication index inputing various related phrases.
CNJ999
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On Thu, 09 Nov 2006 11:57:30 GMT, I said, "Pick a card, any card"

He's just sort of being Steve. No surprise there. -- Ray
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Steve Caple spake thus:

Double yep.
To me, the title of the song should be "The South is Gonna Fall Again". Damned rednecks.
D "damned Yankee" N
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the OTHER Mike wrote:

Now, now - it's not politically correct to bring that up :-).
It is, however, historically correct.
-- It's turtles, all the way down
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On 10 Nov 2006 08:15:58 -0800, the OTHER Mike wrote:

Oh, sure, the cane cutters were and are free workers, yeah, that's the ticket.
--
Steve

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Steve Caple wrote:

You might be surprised.
On St. Prisca plantation, ( St. James parish ) they were known for buying slaves and setting them free. They were offered land and a house and given the rights of a share cropper. Ask me about it sometime. I learned about it when I was about 5 years old ( back in 1960 ) and I asked why the road next to the family house was named "freetown lane" and why they was a village between the pecan orchard and the 600 acres of sugarcane.
But thats ok Steve, go ahead and watch Mandingo and make your judgements. like so many people with no clue.
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Steve Caple wrote:

The point is, as small a % as it may be, it is MY "southern" heritage, I get sick of people thinking everyone in the south was either a black slave or a rich white slave owner.
It's far from the truth but I guess since some of our founding fathers were slave owners, we can paint the picture with a very wide brush. can't we ? Not just the south.
Lets see, New England had endutured ( sp ? ) servants, the west have the chinese, New Orleans had untold Irish slave type workers die....who else should we add to the list.
Let's not forget what we did to the Native Americans or the Japanese in the camps in WWII.
But thats ok,let's just point fingers at the South.
Right.
This country has more to be ashamed of then to be proud of..
But because some yahoo with the screen name "Rebel Yell" makes a post about a "Confederate" railroad, you want to sit on your throne and look down upon ALL people in the south ?
Hopefully someday we can all be as perfect as you.
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