DCC Turntable?

I have a motorized Walthers 90' Turntable #933-3171 and am wondering if it can be controlled by a DCC decoder. I have a DH123 Digitrax decoder and am
wondering if I can connect it to the track power and then to the AC motor on the turntable.
Any thoughts?
Carter Braxton
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Carter Braxton wrote:

Why would you want to control a turntable using a DCC decoder??? The turntable is presumably in a fixed location on the layout? A direction switch and a pushbutton are all that is required. It doesn't require speed control.
Greg.P.
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The alure of a single point of control is strong. I've got a universal learning remote to replace all the other remotes so I can have one point of control of the TV system instead of 3. (Buttons on the console are still very good things.)
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper wrote:

Sure, but the alure of not being fixed to a central control desk _should_ be even stronger! Even for me, not being able to "walk around" it's neccessary to move closer to the loco depot/TT when manouvering locos onto the turntable. That's the spot for the TT controls.
Being able to operate everything from anywhere brings forth the likelyhood of pressing the button time after time because XYZ doesn't do what it should. Meanwhile the garage door is shooting up and down behind you in time with your button pushing! ;-)

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The OP could have a wireless controller and just control the turntable by that. He doesn't have to take his eyes and hands off the controller, just switch to the appropriate mode on the controller and go. (That way, should he happen to glue his hands to the control after a repair... (-:)

This usually doesn't happen without you noticing what went wrong. DAMHIKT. ;-)
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper wrote:

The screwdriver glued to my forefinger tends to get in the way!

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.........crushing your neighbor's car! hehehe...
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It's a matter of positioning... because of some recent changes, the turntable controls are now further away so I can't get close enough to align the bridge by eye without shuttling back and forth between the control and the turntable. I'm looking for an alternative to moving the turntable control.
That being said, my question is still whether or not I can use a dcc decoder and throttle to operate the turntable. Can anyone tell me if that can be done, and if so, is it done the way I asked?
Carter

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Carter Braxton wrote:

It definitely can be done, although precisely how would depend on how the TT is designed to be controlled. My own experience with TTs is with several of European design. These have directional motor power and a solenoid/latch which needs to be powered to stop the latch dropping into a slot at each track position. When power is removed from the latch-solenoid the latch will drop into the slot and power is cut to the drive motor through an inbuilt set of contacts.
A loco decoder would cover motor power and direction and the solenoid could be powered by a function output driving a relay. (depending on current required by the solenoid, assuming it's greater than the function output) Alternatively, the turntable could be controlled by an accessory decoder, using three outputs to drive relays. (clockwise/anti-clockwise/latch)
Regards, Greg.P.
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Carter Braxton wrote:

A DH123 cannot control an AC motor. You could remotor and then use the DH123.
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Chuck Kimbrough wrote:

AC motor? An AC motor will run on DC. Assuming fieldwindings and a bi-directional motor, all that's required is a couple of 10c diodes, much cheaper than remotoring!
Regards, Greg.P.
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If the motor in question does not require voltage and current greater than what the decoder can provide then yes, you can use this DCC decoder to control your turntable. Just hardwire the red/black wires from the decoder to your DCC track power and the orange/gray wires from the decoder to the turntable motor. You'll use a mobile decoder as a stationaly decoder. It is all in the semantics. :-)
But how precisely you'll be able to control the bridge remains to be seen. Some DCC systems have a bit of a lag in response. But you'll be able to control the speed of the motor just as you would if the motor was in a locomotive.
This is the simple answer you were looking for. Peteski
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Yes, Petski.. that IS the simple answer I was looking for. Several of the other group members were very helpful but thank you for cutting straight to the point and giving me the help I was seeking.
Carter
wrote:

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