Fast clock?

I am helping our church build an O-scale layout for the Children's Center.
Does anyone have any recommendations on good reference material (web sites,
books, etc.) on installing a fast clock. We would like the layout to
simulate a 24 hour period of time in 30 minutes or so.
Thanks in advance!
John
Reply to
John & Jill Mrazek
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A 48:1 time ration is much greater than is normally used in fast clock operation. Fast clocks are typically in the 1:5 to 1:10 range and are usually used when operating a layout to a timetable for the purpose of making distances between timetable locations seem greater. Are you really going to ask children to operate this layout to a timetable? Or are you looking for a timer/controller to change layout and room lighting effects, etc. over a 30 minute period to simulate the passage of 24 hours? If your goal is the latter, you do not need a fast clock, but rather should be searching for timers, sequence controllers, small PLCs, etc. GQ
Reply to
Geezer
John Just a thought, if you know any homebrew electronics types(nuts) near you. Lots of digital clock chips out there. They use AC line to generate the seconds and minutes. Now if you can find an electronics hobbyist out there, maybe they can be encouraged to build for you a clock using an outboard oscillator much, much faster than the AC line. A thought, drop a line over at rec.radio.amateur.homebrew. Public Service is a big part of Amateur Radio. Explain what, and why. There are a lot of Amateur Radio operators out there, maybe one of those folks can help you. You might even find someone local to you who might actually be able to help. Paul
John & Jill Mrazek wrote:
Reply to
Paul R. Bennett
The easiest and cheapest way to make a fast clock is to remove the hour hand from a clock. Use the minute hand for hours, and the second hand for minutes. Every five minutes is one hour.
Bob Boudreau Canada
Reply to
Railfan
>>Use the minute hand for hours, and the second hand for minutes.
Reply to
Corelane
Wouldn't one also want to remove the second hand - at a quick glance, how do you know which of its five revolutions per "hour" it's on? GQ
Reply to
Geezer
Model railroader had plans to build a fast clock about 3-5 years ago, i would look at back issues to see, the plans were good.
John & Jill Mrazek wrote in message ...
Reply to
Scott Winterroth
I talked to the guy in charge of the project for the church today.
He wants to use overhead lights in room and lights on layout. He would like the lights in room to be used for day time and control them by dimming to simulate change to night time. He would like gradual transitions on lights across the layout. The layout is O scale and approx 110 feet long. The layout will be used more than an hour a day and probably like a few hours on weekdays and even longer on weekends. He wants different lights coming on and off sporadically across the layout and to simulate day/evening across layout as it spans from east to west coast. All your examples of lighting below are preferred. There are only a couple of men and children building the layout for the church at this time. We range from beginner to novice modeler's. I have been in IT field for 20+ years and could figure out how to integrate use of a PC. My other hobby is collecting and restoring pinball machines, so electronics repair knowledge is good, just never built something from scratch, yet? If there are any books out there that cover these needs, they would help me a lot.
I have received HO train stuff for Christmas for years when I was younger and finally decided to build layout with my son. With our volunteer work on church layout we got hooked and started our own layout in HO scale. The work on church layout has taught me a lot. My son and I helped with all the benchwork, laying track, wiring, and now building the mountains. It is a lot of fun!
Thanks for your help!
John
Reply to
John & Jill Mrazek
You are describing something much more complicated than I have done. I did a quick search on google using "Computer control lighting". Many of the hits deal with stage production lighting, and I think that is the ball park you are approaching. I liked the discussion at
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looks like the an avenue to pursue to do the lighting you describe. But the google search also will suggest many other avenues as well. GQ
Reply to
Geezer
Thanks for your help! I will check out these links.
John
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Reply to
John & Jill Mrazek
John,
Please contact me off-line. I have a system that does exactly what you describe but I've never marketed it. (The prototype is on my layout.)
It uses a PIC (programmable chip) and X10 technology for the light dimming. It's a stand alone system - doesn't need a computer.
Mike Tennent "IronPenguin" Operating Traffic Lights Crossbucks Special Effects Lighting
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Reply to
Mike Tennent

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