How Small Radius Can An 0-4-0 Go?

Froggy wrote:
>>> In England and Australia a railroad truck rides on bogies, >> >> You mean a "wagon" rides on bogies.
> > Yes, but the Aussies have a little wagonoid thing that is a complete > vehicle to which they refer as a truck. It has two axles and is quite > small by NA standards. I think I have heard it called a steel truck, > or something like that. I am still learning about Australian stuff.
LOL! You've presumably seen a reference to a steel S truck. I like your description of "a little wagonoid thing". I'll borrow that, if I may!
But as you correctly note, common usage in Australia is to describe a four-wheel wagon as a truck.
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necessarily integral

bogie is

are very

language of its

integral with

two-axle
a pair of

American
of a truck?

things in

ear Froggy et al, Just to confuse the issue on the North Eastern Railway a tub on wheels was termed a chaldron, a term which preceded steam railways by a considerable period. I believe the term Truck comes from the old english word "to truck" ie to trade which is why US drivers of Lorries are called truckers rather than drivers or hauliers.........or less polite terms......... :) As far as i know a bogie was also part of a horse drawn lorry, I prepare to stand corrected... :)) Beowulf
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Sounds good to me. Froggy,
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wrote:

Possibly why we raise vegetables for sale at the Saturday market in a truck garden...
Not enough iron in the soil for a bogie garden, I reckon...
CL
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On Tue, 23 Aug 2005 10:33:37 -0400, Daniel A. Mitchell wrote:

There's the kernel of the issue; now march forth and conquer.
--
Steve

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"Daniel A. Mitchell" wrote:

The first railway 2 axle trucks originated in the US and arrived in Britain and Europe via Norris and Baldwin etc imports. Britain of course is basically flat so rolling stock didn't really nead flexible underframes beyond that given by springing.
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On Thu, 01 Sep 2005 10:17:38 +1200, Greg Procter wrote:

Compared to, say, Kansas or Nebraska?
Bwahahahaha!
--
Steve

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Steve Caple wrote:

I would have assumed that wagons from Kansas and Nebraska also rolled over the lumpy bits of the USa(?)
Regards, Greg.P.
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Kansas and Nebraska do have a few lumps, but North Dakota is a gargantuan billiard table for most of its expanse. If you pour a container of water out onto the ground in North Dakota, it will make a circular, slightly domed puddle. Froggy,
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Froggy, @, thepond..com wrote:

Right, and if I comment on circular, slightly domed puddles you're all gonna come back at me with "anti-american" and New Orleans insults!

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Froggy @ thepond..com wrote:

Looking at the overall 'big picture' North Dakota is indeed rather flat ... but locally it can be quite precipitous. There are some big Coulees (valleys/canyons) in various places. The longeset (1609 feet) trestle on the old Great Northern Ry. is across one of these, near the middle of the state, just west of Minot. And, while the G.N. certainly had taller trestles, this one is respectable in that regard (102 feet high).
Also, the western part of the state is very rough, in the large 'badlands' areas. There are no tall mountains to be sure, but the topography there is ANYTHING but 'flat'.
Dan Mitchell ===========
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"> The first railway 2 axle trucks originated in the US and arrived in Britain

ummm I take it you havent seen the Pennines or the west coast route?... or the Highland Railway ?there are thses bumps in the landscape........ Beowulf :)
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Beowulf wrote:

By NZ standards those are flat. :-) I take it you haven't seen the NZ Canterbury Plains? Last time my daughter took me for a flight (she's a pilot) we were skirting the tops of the rolling bits at 8,000 feet.
Regards, Greg.P.
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That's because NZ's South Island looks like Switzerland with Kiwis. I want to make enough money to go there and do some trout fishing on the South Island. in December and January Froggy,
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On Fri, 02 Sep 2005 03:29:19 GMT, Froggy wrote:

fruit salad on ice?
--
Steve

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Steve Caple wrote:

Here in NZ, a "Kiwi" is firstly a flightless bird, and secondly a New Zealand citizen (slang) A "kiwi fruit" is the hairy brown fruit with the green inside.

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On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 16:07:40 +1200, Greg Procter wrote:

Green, pink, what's the dffference; we're equal opportunity dissers.
--
Steve

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Steve Caple wrote:

Any time you eat a pink Kiwi fruit, just remember that I now deny all responsibility!!!
Ouch - I just figured one variety that is pink inside - you filthy ....
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Froggy, @, thepond..com wrote:

Sure - that's the norm, isn't it? :-)

If you're in the NW corner then look me up!

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Obviously doesn't know what he's talking about.
The reason four wheel trucks caught on in North America is for the same reason that the 4-4-0 was so popular early in North American railway history.
It's nothing to do with the land being flat, or hilly, or even mountainous, it was the quality of the track that was the problem.
North American track was so poorly laid, on untreated, with many times round ties, with little or no ballast laid on a profile that closely followed the contours of the land, as it still does today. Therefore, ridged four wheeled, two axle cars, both passenger and freight, couldn't stay on the track, even at the low speeds then typical, as they had a limited amount of twisting action before derailing.
Hence the urgent need for something far more flexible than rigid wheel based cars and locomotives. Thus was born the four wheeled truck and the 4-4-0 design of locomotive, both very flexible and able to stay on the track. -- Cheers Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra /
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