N scale question

I've been looking at track plans, etc. and with the N scale being
1:160, it comes out at about 33 feet per mile. What is the most common
method of "reducing" that to a manageable factor? Or is it pretty much
up to the discretion of the person doing the track design?
John
Reply to
Aodhan
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Only if one models in the 1:160 N scale and not British (or Japanese or ...) N scale. :-)
Perhaps rather than reproducing the entire railway (BR?) to scale you might think in terms of train length scenes: - Station scene. - Suburbs scene. - Industrial area. - open country scene. - bridge and surrounds. - etc. Breaks between scenes can be as minimal as a group of large trees, an overbridge or a factory or two in front of the tracks. A layout broken up in such a way will seem longer than a straight flat 33 foot baseboard.
Scenes on model layouts generally are foreshortened, usually to suit one's longest train, whereas for example a prototype station platform might be long enough for two maximum length trains.
Regards, Greg.P.
Reply to
Greg Procter
You do 'selective' compression. Most *prototype* railroads include miles and miles and miles of track going through miles and miles and miles of undeveloped (eg no buildings, etc.) land. On a model railroad, you replace these streches with a 'scenery break' of some sort, such as a clump of trees or a *short* tunnel (that is representing the ends of two distant tunnels maybe). And there are other tricks, including games with double-sided 'backdrops' and over and under tricks with multiple-levels. And tricks with staging yards (behind or under the main layout).
Reply to
Robert Heller
You think N scale is bad? How about all those poor H0, 0, S or other larger gauges layout owners trying to deal with "scale distances". It is all up to the layout builder's imagination.
Peteski
Reply to
Peter W.
It's up to you, entirely. It's _your_ layout, after all.
I recommend John Armstrong's Trackplanning for Realistic Operation, and his Creative Layout Design, both publ. by Kalmbach Publishing. They will answer this question, and a whole host of others you haven't even stumbled across yet. And very good writing, too. :-)
Reply to
Wolf

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