Any vintage Toledo scale fans here?

Awl --
The old floor-standing platform scales, 24" face, usually on wheels.
I have a 75# model (31-0851 FB, S/N 728 249), that I'm modifying (longer
throat), and I'm looking at a 125# and 2,000# cap models.
tare.com supports these scales, and tells me that this scale was made
between 1943 and 1945. Parts are very expensive.
Cupla Qs:
It seems that a small scale may be counterbalanced to read heavier weights.
But can a scale that reads 2,000# at "full scale" (full needle rotation) be
made to read, say, 200# at full scale, without messing with the internal
weights?
Has anyone altered the internal weights? Tips on doing this?
Any other leads/sources for parts, intact scales, etc?
These scales are a joy to behold. A little heavy to hold/hump around, but
still a joy to behold.
Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®
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I have one of these a sittin' in the barn. Want it? Werks Grate.
karl
Reply to
Karl Townsend
"Karl Townsend" fired this volley in news:4a84246c$0$28114$ snipped-for-privacy@auth.newsreader.octanews.com:
One-a what? I can't see it!
LLoyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
What capacity? Where are you located?
Reply to
Proctologically Violated©®
The platform scales I've messed with(way in the distant past), have had some very clever combinations of levers and knife edge/hangers underneath. You'd probably have to change the leverage ratio to change the the F.S. reading. Not really worth the effort since digital scales are so cheap these days. If your time is worth nothing, have at it! A 350 lb F.S. digital scale reading in 10ths can be had for less than $30, $20 if you get it at the right time at a dollar store.
Stan
Reply to
stans4
125# in MN
Reply to
Karl Townsend

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