Any Hams here?

Ive been doing the online tests for the Technician exam. Of the 6
times Ive taken the sample exams...I passed it 5 times. Of the 4 times
Ive taken the online sample General exam..Ive passed it twice.
This without any study.
I was a ham nearly 40 yrs ago..and we didnt have FM or packet radio
etc etc and there was a CW portion (Thank Crom its gone!)
I picked up a Kenwood TS-530SE transiever in the last load of Stuff
from that mini-storage clean out along with a couple boxes of other
radio Stuff. The radio turns on..and gives me a hiss out of the
onboard speaker..but I dont get any signals on the old long wire
antenna Ive got up..so there are Issues. Ive downloaded the
schematics..gonna make me think and at my age...relearning board
repair is gonna really hurt. Got all the gear for checking it out
though..Tektronics scope, Tektronics freq counter, Tektronics VOM etc
etc...mil surp RF generator...all the proper Stuff. Everything except
a dummy load.
Anyone got a 50 ohm, 100 watt dummy load collecting dust I can
swap/trade for?
Btw..Im up to my ass in scopes if anybody needs a couple or 3. I
think Ive got 5-6 up on the shelf and I certainly dont need that many.
One for the service truck, one for the bench, a spare and Im good.
Gunner
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie
2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible
3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible
4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie
5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw
6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
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Gunner fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
de WA4ZEG (inactive)
CW still ought to be required. Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Gunner fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
An incandescent lamp isn't perfect, but works.
Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
I struggled damned hard with CW. I really had a hard time with it. The fellow who did my test for General..I truely believe gave me brownie points to pass the code part of the exam. In fact..I didnt have a General, but a Conditional, as I was 250 miles away from a regular testing place as I recall so was given the exam by one of the Old Farts who worked with me on theory etc etc.
I was really into RTTY when I got my ticket. Cant be much of that anymore. Not with a Mod 15 printer and rolls of paper
Gunner
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
And it wont radiate RF?
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
Cool !!!
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
Antenna isn't quite tuned up right. :)
Reply to
Richard
Gunner fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
Some, but you can put it in a bucket of shielding to stop that (mostly). Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Sure, KD7HB. And I just passed the amateur extra test in November at age 73, so you can sure do it!
Paul
Reply to
Paul Drahn
The closest I can come to that is remembering that I used a 300 baud modem when I started computing. I remember dot matrix printers, too. (I'll bet half the folks alive now don't.)
I recently bought a BaoFeng UV-5R portable radio and am in the process of learning about HAM. A buddy is going to help. (Terry, the same guy in San Marcos to whom I referred you years ago, who's doing the automating of some small SoCal manufacturing firms.) Anyway, until I take the Technician's test, I'm in listening and learning mode.
Reply to
Larry Jaques
??
Gunner
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
and that bucket of sheilding would be?
Now you may understand why I want a real honest to goodness dummy load.
Gunner
The methodology of the left has always been:
1. Lie 2. Repeat the lie as many times as possible 3. Have as many people repeat the lie as often as possible 4. Eventually, the uninformed believe the lie 5. The lie will then be made into some form oflaw 6. Then everyone must conform to the lie
Reply to
Gunner
Gunner fired this volley in news: snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com:
Aw, C'mon Gunner! You 'passed' the test, right? You know what a Faraday cage is, right?
Put it all in a steel bucket with some grounding straps for the lid to bond to the body, and leave a little hole so you can see the lamp glow as you load into it!
Passed? Have they not included the basics, anymore? Lloyd
Reply to
Lloyd E. Sponenburgh
Traditionally it's a gallon paint can, with the RF connector in the center of the lid. The oil-filled Heathkit 'cantenna' was good for a kilowatt.
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jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I still have a couple of them; first one was a Toshiba. I remember the manual (which I still have around here somewhere) went into great detail referring to the various escape codes that could be used to manually operate the printer over a serial/parallel interface, from printing actual letters to just pushing one pin out.
They don't do stuff like that anymore.
Jon
Reply to
Jon Danniken
In the mid 80's I worked on the dot matrix inventors' next project, a four color ink jet printer that could build up a 3D image from its molten plastic ink.
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"It wasn't long before someone had the idea to build three dimensional (3D) models using the same idea."
The idea was obvious to us from the ink stalagmites that accumulated on test stands and prototypes, but for several reasons that machine was very restricted in the height it could build up -accurately- and we were too busy trying to make it reliable to waste effort on most of the crazy things we knew the plastic-spraying ink jets could do. Plus the ink had a low melting point and poor properties other than looking good on the page. jsw
Reply to
Jim Wilkins
I seem to remember that there were programs for the cheap appliance computers (e.g. the Commodore VIC-20 or something like that) which would display and send RTTY when connected to a receiver and transmitter. A lot more portable (and quieter) than a Mod-15. :-)
I certainly remember them -- various speeds and sizes of them, too. ;_)
Good Luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
Even better -- mount it in a gallon paint can, with a good RF connector in the lid -- and oil inside to carry the heat from the lamp to the walls of the can for cooling.
The higher the frequency, the more that lamp will differ from the proper impedance -- with all those little curly Tungsten wires as the filament. But the can will at least keep the RF from radiating. The main risk with a poor impedance match would be damage to the final of the transmitter.
Anyone ever have a Heathkit "Cantenna"? Was it an array of carbon resistors in oil, or an incandescent lamp? The former would be more constant impedance, at least.
Good Luck, DoN.
Reply to
DoN. Nichols
There are programs to use a PC to send and receive morse code that are freeware. There is also hardware with a microprocessor that decode morse code for about $30 from China.
Dan
Reply to
dcaster

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