OTish: Litytle Rascals in Railroadin

The views of the yard are worth the price of admission!
Part 1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IywTUOn736c
Part 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
cX8lT3cS4&feature=related

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Sorry 'bout the typo...
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On 2/16/2008 3:56 PM Big Rich Soprano spake thus:

You mean "Litytle Rascals"? Isn't that the way it was spelled in Olde Englishe?
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Doth speaketh the truth nave...
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On Sun, 17 Feb 2008 03:53:59 GMT, Big Rich Soprano wrote:

Thou art cryptic, but your comment is apse.
--
Steve

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Ah yes. Me thinks my bicarbonate doth fail me anon...
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What fun!!
Even with the typo.
The views of the yard are worth the price of admission!
Part 1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IywTUOn736c
Part 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v
cX8lT3cS4&feature=related
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It's interesting that their cellphones recorded in black and white black then.
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black then.
Locomotives are black, and the kids -with one exception- are white.
Where's the surprise?
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Back before about the mid-60's, the world was black and white. Then color was invented.

It's interesting that their cellphones recorded in black and white black then.
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Val wrote:

[...]
You must be really, really young.
Or else you just don't watch old movies....
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OK, I know that color was really invented in the 30s - ala Wizard of Oz, Adventures of Robin Hood, Gone With the Wind...
8-)
(and I'm not that young - I remember the three color celophane filter on the TV)
Val wrote:

[...]
You must be really, really young.
Or else you just don't watch old movies....
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Big Rich Soprano wrote:

I can only imagine how the liability lawyers today would have strokes over the stunts they let those kids do at that time.
--

Rick Jones
Remove the Extra Dot to e-mail me
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I doubt they were actually letting little Buckwheat lie between the rails and let a Santa Fe Mikado pass over him multiple times, much less have him grab the pilot from directly ahead and climb aboard the moving loco. More likely those sequences were done with dummies and/or stuntkids. (And some of the shots were filmed at very low speeds and then the film was sped up. Santa Fe wasn't going to risk a high-speed cornfield meet just to make a movie!)
After all, Buckwheat and his pals were the producer's meal-tickets, and the producers had an interest in protecting them for that reason if naught else.
BTW: for Santa Fe fans.
Most of the film was shot in the Santa Fe Los Angeles yards, and you can see the L.A. River off to the left of the shot in some scenes, and the distinctive L.A. concrete highway bridges in others. (They were largely 1930s WPA projects, and some still survive.)
The later high-speed parts of the film were shot out in the then completely undeveloped Cucamonga/Guasti areas east of L.A. and west of San Bernardino. Those twenty-foot-high eucalyptus trees the train is flashing past are now hundred footers!
-Pete
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Once you guys are done picking apart the elephant let me ask this, did ya like the episode?
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Damn, i must be getting old because I found the kids playing in the rail yard to be really disturbing.
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My friends and I did it all the time during the late '40s and early '50s. Nobody thought anything about it back then.
Or if they did, we never heard anything about it.
-Pete
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On 2/18/2008 8:15 PM P. Roehling spake thus:

Same here, except it was in the 1960s. (C&NW in Chicago suburbs, to be precise.)
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

I used to take my daughter (3-4 years old) on photo trips to the CPR yards in South Edmonton. She played happily there, picking dandelions and such, to make a bouquet for Mom. Nobody ever interfered. Occasionally, we got a wave from the switch crew. I just scanned a slide of her sitting on the (clean!) gravel, with "pretty pebbles" in her hands. Sigh. ;-)
--
wolf k.

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Yeah, I used to regularly tresspass on the LIRR tracks with and without my dad during the 1970s when I was 7-11 years old. He taught me how to put my ear on the rail to hear when the train was coming and crush pennies with Alco C420s
Later in the 1980s I used to tresspass on the VTR yard in Rutland with my camera as a teen and an adult.
I kinda of miss the those good old days when you could get away with doing things like that.
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