Possibly dumb question?

Brake wheels.
All facing the same way, forward, backward, doesn't matter?
Frank

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On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 23:24:51 -0500, grey snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Gray Ghost) wrote:

I would imagine that they would all face toward the center of the car, so they would be accessible. If it 'twere facing the coupler, where would a body stand to turn it?
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(Gray Ghost) wrote:

Actually I meant when the cars are assembled into a train, are the ends of the car on which the brake wheels mounted facing toward the engine or caboose? Railroad dependent? AAR rules? Union rules? Don't matter?
Frank Tauss
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Gray Ghost skriver:

Let's think:
Du you see any turntables for cars, so they can turn them around, to make the brakes point "the right way"?
I don't - so I think it doen't matter.
Klaus
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On Tue, 11 Sep 2007 07:06:05 +0200, "Klaus D. Mikkelsen"

Actually cars are often turned on turntables (if available) but more commonly on WYES, but not for brake wheel reasons, but rather for making the lading accessible for unloading, as often a car can only be unloaded from one side, and that side may not line up with the customers dock until the car is turned.
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wrote:

Don't forget the rare case of a unit train equipped with rotary couplers. They would all have to be lined up the same way. I've been told that is wy cars with rotary couplers have one end painted a bright colro.
dlm
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Dan Merkel wrote:

That would be "cars with a rotary coupler". You only need one per car and two would make getting meeting couplers in sync more difficult. The bright painted end almost certainly indicates the rotating coupling end.
Greg.P.
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I don't think it normally matters. At least I've never heard of anyone arraigning a freight train with that in mind.
That said, there _are_ some passenger cars that do have a well-defined front and rear*, and in those cases you could say that the brake wheels were always on either the front or the rear of the car. (In fact, entire passenger trains were commonly turned on a wye at the ends of their runs rather then just turning some of the individual cars.)
*Observations, most RPOs, most dome cars, diners, Etc.
Pete
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there is no set direction for brake wheels. The crews are not about to turn a car to make the wheel face east so in any given train you'll see: AB, BA, AB, AB, BA etc. with B being the brake end and A the other end. In a train i assisted last night they only have to have 2 brakes on. The orientation was AB, BA, BA, AB so i waited at the 3rd "B" end for the conductor.
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On Mon, 10 Sep 2007 23:46:29 -0500, grey snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Gray Ghost) wrote:

Nope, no such rules, railroad, AAR, union or otherwise.
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net wrote:

Here in New Zealand all the brake levers/wheels are on the right side and north end. Of course we can do that because there are no reversing situations.
Greg.P.
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What about a train running from Wellington to Palmerston North via the Wairarapa?
John
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John Dennis wrote:

The coastal line and the Wairarapa line both enter Palmerston North from the south.
Several stations (Christchurch for example) were built in "Y" formation, (Lytellton Port at the base, North and South as the arms) so the brake levers pointed north north of Christchurch and south south of Chch. The only exception was one coalmine branch on the West Coast with a Fell incline where the coal hopper wagons all had their brake levers on the downhill end and so were at odds with the rest of the system.
When the Cook Strait ferries were introduced (1960s)the two islands effectively became connected for through running and all the coupler hooks in the South Island had to be moved to the other end. In the early 90s the Christchurch "Y" had the third track added so trains could run Dunedin-Picton without entering Christchurch yards. That requires a corresponding move around the Y if the return train goes Picton-Chch. The NI remains single directional.
Greg.P.
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Can you explain this?
How is it possible that they built an entire country's railroad system without any wyes, turntables, or balloon tracks, and wye would they do it that way to begin with?
Pete
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wrote

All Kiwi trains run the same direction ;).
Cheers, John
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On 9/12/2007 4:57 AM John Fraser spake thus:

Due, no doubt, to the Coriolis Effect ...
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On Wed, 12 Sep 2007 10:09:55 -0700, David Nebenzahl wrote:

No, silly, the Flying Coriolis were the ones who helped Mussolini make the trains run on time.
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Since they've basically only got two directions from which to choose -north or south- you'd think the islands would eventually end up sinking at one end or the other due to the weight of all those trains accumulating over time...
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"P. Roehling" wrote:

Err, basically the South Island is two tectonic plates pushing together and gradually rising, with the errosion detrius forming the eastern (Canturbury) plains. The North Island is a collection of overlapping active/semiactive/temporarily dormant volcanoes. We're not in the least bit worried about any land sinking, but we do tend to worry a little about earthquakes and the odd puff of smoke above local cones.
Greg.P.
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John Fraser wrote:

And back!
Greg.P.
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