Question for You

I am seriously thinking of putting a train in my garden for summer use to run around my flowers. Any suggestions on how to keep it dry in case of sudden summer rain storms? Was going to use railroad ties and/or cement blocks to put the track on. What do you think? Will this work?

Reply to
Jan
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Where do you live? Arizona or Vermont? What kind of train are you thinking about?

I built some outdoor G gauge a few years ago in a mid-Atlantic state using commercial LGB and Aristo brass track laid on pressure treated 2 x 4's laid flush with ground level where possible. I have not found it necessary to protect the track from rain. I park train cars under my deck to which I added a corrugated roofing strip to deflect any rain from the rolling stock,but alays bring the locos inside for storage. This has worked well for me through two, and starting a third, global warming winters. I don't think you need anything as heavy as cement blocks or RR ties south of the Mason-Dixon line. Further north may be more of an issue. I might worry about migration of indivdual cement blocks based on my experience with a loose brick in sand side walk. I do find it necessary to clean the track after a month or more lull, but this is easier than trying to cover the track. Note that the major G track systems address section-to-section continuity (conducting grease for LGB and fishplate set screws for Aristo). I considered doing the layout in Gargraves stainless steel in either O or Standard gauge, but decided the track systems really weren't designed with outdoor in mind. Geezer

Reply to
Geezer

In his HTML post to this newsgroup, the temperature indicator shows that it is displaying the forecast for Medford, Oregon.

Reply to
Brian Smith

Geezer - Thanks for your fast and informative answer. I also found a great train site online with all kinds of information about garden trains. Thanks again!!

Reply to
Jan

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You might enjoy Ray Dunakin's photos of his In-Ko-Pah Railroad under construction:

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Good luck with your garden railroad!

Bill Bill's Railroad Empire N Scale Model Railroad:

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History of N Scale:
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Railroad Books, Toys, and Trains:
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to 1,200 sites:
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Reply to
Bill

My apologies. I have male friends with the same name as yours.

Reply to
Brian Smith

Buy a copy of Garden Railways magazine. There are ads for books on the subject in it. Buy one of them, or check out your local library (they can get a book by interlibrary loan if they don't have a copy.)

You could also google on "garden railway railroad". You'll get lots of hits - and most of them will answer questions you haven't yet realised you need to ask... :-)

Nice thing about paper books: you don't need electricity to read them.

Hah!

Reply to
Wolf

Except maybe at night! :)

Reply to
The Seabat

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