Railroad vs Railway?

wrote:


Then we all should have no clue whatever about what you are speaking. I think the number of people in your minority is approaching one, or at least a single digit number.
Froggy,
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Froggy, @, thepond..com wrote:

Make it two.
And get 'Pearl Harbour' spelt in English!
Greg.P.
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Two is still a single digit number. You need to learn how to spell "h-a-r-b-o-r" There is no 'u' in it. Ditto "a-l-u-m-i-n-u-m" only a single ' i ' .
Froggy,
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Froggy @ thepond..com spake thus:

You know why the Brits chose "aluminium", don't you? Being the rectilinear folks they are, they wanted the name of the newly-discovered element to be orthogonal with the others (sodium, cadmium, etc.).
--
To the arrogant putzes at NBC:

Do we call the country Italia? Is its capital Roma?
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wrote:

Which begs the question: What about oxygen, carbon, chlorine, gold, copper, lanthanum and manifold others that do not end in "ium"? What is to become of those?
I have an unobtanium (atomic number 113, atomic weight 287) mine modeled on my model railway. However I am going to have to remove the points going into it since the mine has never produced anything to date, and has never shipped a car. It now appears that unobtanium is only readily available inside the event horizon of black holes.
Froggy,
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Froggy @ thepond..com spake thus:

I believe the only unobtanium mines are in Obscuristan.
By the way, is it related to upsidasium?
--
To the arrogant putzes at NBC:

Do we call the country Italia? Is its capital Roma?
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wrote:

the
(sodium,
and manifold others that

mine modeled on my model

going into it since the mine

car.
inside the event horizon of

Speaking of oddball elements, chemicals, and so forth; here in Ottawa, U.C., there's a popular conservative morning radio talk show which at one time had posted the following on it's website:
"A major research institution (MRI) has recently announced the discovery of the heaviest chemical element yet known to science. The new element has been tentatively named Governmentium. Governmentium has 1 neutron, 12 assistant neutrons, 75 deputy neutrons, and 224 assistant deputy neutrons, giving it an atomic mass of 312. These 312 particles are held together by forces called morons, which are surrounded by vast quantities of lepton-like particles called peons. Since governmentium has no electrons, it is inert. However, it can be detected as it impedes every reaction with which it comes into contact. A minute amount of governmentium causes one reaction to take over four days to complete when it would normally take less than a second. Governmentium has a normal half-life of three years; it does not decay, but instead undergoes a reorganization in which a portion of the assistant neutrons and deputy neutrons exchange places. In fact, governmentium's mass will actually increase over time, since each reorganization will cause some morons to become neutrons, forming isodopes.
"This characteristic of moron-promotion leads some scientists to speculate that governmentium is formed whenever morons reach a certain quantity in concentration. This hypothetical quantity is referred to as Critical Morass."
Garth Allen. (no, I can't take credit for it)
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On Thu, 2 Mar 2006 12:53:07 -0500, allergy wrote:

Yep, those Lush Rimburgers only see _government_ bureaucracy as a problem, totally ignoring the more common and more powerfully corrosive element with almost identical structure and composition, Corporatium.
--
Steve

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You've convinced me. Let's go with sodum and cadmum. Uranum anyone?
--
Bill Kaiser
snipped-for-privacy@mtholyoke.edu
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On 2 Mar 2006 09:22:32 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@mtholyoke.edu wrote:

Sodom Uranus?
--
Steve

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David Nebenzahl wrote: [...]

From Wikipedia:
In the English-speaking world, the spellings (and associated pronunciations) aluminium and aluminum are both in common use in scientific and nonscientific contexts. In the United States, the spelling aluminium is largely unknown, and the spelling aluminum predominates. Elsewhere in the English-speaking world the spelling aluminium predominates, and the spelling aluminum is largely unknown. However, in Canada both spellings are common, due to the multiple influences on the language of its proximity to the United States, its British colonial past and the large number of native French speakers. ......................
NB that my own first encounter with the element's name was in German: Aluminium. When I first saw "aluminum" (about 1954), I thought it was a spelling error.
If you want to know more about the spelling, look it up. Google "aluminium" to get the Wikipedia hit. I noted that the -ium spelling was preferred in the USA for most of the 1800s. Interesting.
It's interesting to me (as a former teacher) how much people rely on what they learned in grade school when it comes to "correct" English.... :-)
HTH
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Froggy, @, thepond..com wrote:

Very true, however it advances the current total twice as far towards double digits.

Of course there is - it reflects the way the word is pronounced.

That's only because you yanks can't cope with four syllable words, we wouldn't expect you to.
Regards, Greg.P.
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Indeed. It has nothing to do with concatenating polysyllabic words; it has to do with affected spelling. This is the 21st Century man! It is time to throw off the affectations of the "Better than thou" class and streamline the lexicon. Clinging to old-fashioned, misspelled words is a thoroughgoing manifestation of one's curmudgeonliness.
Indeed. It has nothing to do with concatenating polysyllabic words; it has to do with affected spelling. This is the 21st Century man! It is time to throw off the affectations of the "Better than thou" class and streamline the lexicon. Clinging to old-fashioned, misspelled words is a thoroughgoing manifestation of one's curmudgeonliness.

Please re-write the above quoted text, demonstrating the effective use of words containing four or more syllables in the sentence. EXAMPLE: "A - mer - i - can", instead of "Yank".
I haven't the slightest difficulty understanding words of more than four syllables. Trust me on this one. I wouldn't prevaricate anent such an important issue. Oh, by the way, don't worry about spelling, since the problem is likely the way you were taught in the early years. It's not really your fault.
Froggy,
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<Froggy

No, that's pronounced "merkin". BTW, you should look that word up. :-)
-- Cheers
Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra /
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Froggy, @, thepond..com wrote:

I know you consider yourselves to be American and of course you are, but logic dictates that all people living in or of the Americas are Americans, so If you say "Americans" then I cannot be certain that you are Peruvians or Guatamalians or Mexicans. You have no name for yourselves or your country and "United States of Americans" is a bit wordy while "yanks" (note small "y") is a term recognised world wide without confusion.

Certainly, but yanks as a whole have settled on a simplified version of 'aluminium' which says it all.

I was quite happy spelling aluminium as I was taughr - you or whoever attempted to convince me that it should be dumbed down. ie, I'm the one being attacked.
Regards, Greg.P.
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And where were you last year when I said almost exactly the same thing? Roger got right riled up at being called an American, even though he certainly is one.
I am happy enough with "Merkin" although that is really not a legitimate word. It is "American" pronounced with a south Texas accent. One of our dead presidents routinely pronounced it that way.

I don't think so. I think everyone in the world ~except~ the Brits and Antipodeans says 'aluminum'. So you are correct and the rest of the world is wrong? Yeah, I would expect that to be the way you all think.

There is a difference between "dumbed-down" and correct. But no matter, All Merkins know what aluminium is, so it's not a problem if you want to use affected speech. No one really cares very much. BTW, I think you were the one who broached the subject this round. Something about learning how to [mis]spell harbor with an unnecessary 'U' added to it.
Froggy,
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Froggy, @, thepond..com wrote:

You'd have to narrow the date down a little from just "last year" as I spent a total of several months an week long intervals away from home.
Roger got

Of course he is!

It also has a degree of rudeness attached to it, being as it is a pubic wig.
It is

I wonder which of the two he was actually refering to?

I'lll allow you your thoughts if you'll allow me mine ;-)
I think everyone in the world ~except~ the Brits and Antipodeans

Of course.

Of course - you don't think the US has a monopoly on arrogance, do you? ;-)

Sure, but you yanks do make a habit of chopping bits of the written word.

Aluminium uses the same ending as many other metals - ium.

Certainly I put forward that example, in response to a posting from someone else. That might make me second.
Regards, Greg.P.
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Greg Procter spake thus:
Well, apparently we've finally met our match. (And no, not meant as in the usage with "rugby": we call them "games", thank you very much.)

Sure, just like aurum (gold), argentum (silver), ferrum (iron), lanthanum, plumbum (lead), and tantalum, right?
Only in the Brit-twit mind is there such rectilinear orthogonality as to engender "aluminium". "Pip-pip, got to get all our ducks in a row, good chap: aluminIUM it is!"
--
To the arrogant putzes at NBC:

Do we call the country Italia? Is its capital Roma?
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

What you lack in quality you surely make up in quantity. :-)

Exactly - err, no.

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Eh its Aluminium in almost evry other language then American, and it certainly is aluminium in the language where the word comes from. Latin
But I didn't say this to arouse anyone.
Grtz Jan
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