Railroad vs Railway?

wrote:


Talking about car names , would you believe that Skoda in Chzechia ( where they come from ) means "what a pitty ". Now i know there's a lot of names all over the world that mean something stupid in another language but in the native language is kinda dumb to me.
Grtz Jan, wich is a guys name where I come from.
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On 28 Feb 2006 04:32:23 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@bigfoot.com wrote:

That ain't all that's wrong about it!
--
Steve

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I understand that a railroad goes somewhere distant, as in Chicago Northwestern Railroad, and that a railway goes somewhere local, such as a marine railway, or a mine railway. But I could be wrong.
Chas.
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The Santa Fe Railway, now part of BNSF Railway was/is a bit more than local.
J. Bright
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You call it a "railroad" and I'll call it a railway".
Both of us are correct.
-- Cheers
Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra /
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jhbright wrote:

As was the Great Northern Railway, now also part of BNSF.
Dan Mitchell ===========
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jhbright wrote:

Santa Fe? Never heard of it.
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According to the dictionary : RAILROAD; especially : a railroad operating with light equipment or within a small area. Used mainly in the UK and Canada. Bottom line they are interchangeable.
Don Altenberger
On 27 Feb 2006 20:20:04 -0800, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

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UK general usage would almost always be "railway", with from a UK perspective the US using "railroad".. Meaning essentially the same thing. In the UK there are other associated words e.g. "pathway", "roadway" and "tramway" that show the general case. In the US the usage was often changed as companies went into and out of receivership and subsequent re-organisation.
Actual language translation as in "Italy" vs "Italia" doesn't come into it. The person in the foreign land doesn't use our language version any more than we do his. We don't need to change any more than he does.
We also do have different meanings for the same words as well as different words for the same item. Any number of examples. The US soccer is the rest of the world's football. The US football is something that is broken up to fill in the gaps between the adverts. (OK so this is a wind up! The word soccer is used in the UK, but only in a secondary sense. The FA, UEFA, FIFA are all football examples......) The UK pavement as the US sidewalk is a more typical example.
In the end we only need to be understood within our own context. If our context changes when we travel, then we have to adapt our usage. Simple really.
Regards
Len
wrote:

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If a british person speaks about american rail, would they use "railway" or "railroad"?
Would anyone residing in the USA use the term "railway" to distinguish non-american railways from the american way of railroading?
In most non-English-speaking countries (at least in Europe) "railway" is much more common. How is it in english-speaking countries in other parts of the world, such as Australia or Newzealand?
--
tobias benjamin köhler ____________________________________ snipped-for-privacy@uncia.de
._______..__________.._______.._________. <>_<> <>_<>
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tobias b köhler spake thus:

No, not unless they're singing the old song, "I've been working on the railway". We ('Merkins) use "railroad". (As in "he got railroaded by the court into a 5-to-life sentence".)
--
To the arrogant putzes at NBC:

Do we call the country Italia? Is its capital Roma?
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On Tue, 28 Feb 2006 11:33:18 -0800, David Nebenzahl wrote:

Ya mean that raggedy tarp over the rusting ole hog back of the garage?
--
Steve

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Steve Caple spake thus:

No, you're thinking of that other one, the "Shroud of Gremlin".
--
To the arrogant putzes at NBC:

Do we call the country Italia? Is its capital Roma?
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tobias b khler wrote:

It's always been "Railway" in New Zealand. Doesn't "Eisenbahn" translate directly to "Iron road"?
Regards, Greg.P. NZ
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Greg Procter schrieb am 01.03.2006 04:57:

Babel fish translates "Bahn" to "course".
--

mit freundlichen Gruessen Reinhard Peters

mail: snipped-for-privacy@rub-peters.de
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Reinhard Peters wrote:

Seriously now: Bahn = trail, track, path, way, course, road, ....
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Bahn is more like "route", course would be "Platz" as in golfplatz.
Grtz Jan Btw I live only 75 Km from Kln but to us Dutch its Keulen, the eu pronounced the same as .
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Jan (Bouli) Van Gerwen spake thus:

Ah, yes, the umlaut, the thing no American (including myself) can get their lips around to pronounce correctly!
By the way, what is "grtz" an abbreviation for?
--
To the arrogant putzes at NBC:

Do we call the country Italia? Is its capital Roma?
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"Koeln" then?
"Hchst"? Or "Hoechst", the company I used to work for back in the 1970s? Pronounced "Herkst" in English. :-)
-- Cheers
Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra /
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"Roger T." wrote:

You have to get everything to the back of your mouth/throat to pronounce the .oech.. bit, .erk.. really isn't it!
Regards, Greg.P.
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