Re: Brick colored paint

Paints can be mixed to whatever color you want to have. If you're unsure of what colors to mix with what, ask a friend that is an artist painter.
Next is that brick really isn't one color. Aside from the different bricks in different areas being different actual colors, weathering also changes the color of a brick. Finally, the individual bricks in a building are usually a range of colors near the basic color and this is something that you may not have noticed. After you do the basic color, you'll have to go through and temper each brick with some wash to bring out it's own color on the wall. After that, you can add in the mortar lines and weathering of the whole wall.
-- Yeppie, Bush is such an idiot that He usually outwits everybody else. How dumb!
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The colour of brick is dependent on the colour of the local clay used to make them plus a little on the means of firing. From there, brick buildings tend to last a long time so the weathering can vary from almost none through to no original colour visible. In addition, the colour of the mortar has an effect on the overall appearance, varying from pristine white through to completely weathered. This weathering lets down the initial white much quicker than it does the brick. I tend to spray with red-oxide automotive spray (I spray almost everything with red oxide =8^) then wash with a mix of white and burnt sienna acrylic for the mortar, then wipe it partially off and finally lock it on with an artist's matt varnish spray.
Regards, Greg.P.
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A big thanks to everyone who responded to my question about painting bricks. Lots of good ideas and techniques! DanK
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White mortar was very common for brickwork on the "old days"
Generally it was a lime mortar, and sometimes only used for "pointing" the exterior joints.
--
Bob Small

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You're not trying to do a Mark Newton on me, are you? Some places here in New Zealand we have pure white/opaic sand and the mortar made with it turns out as near white as damit. The length of time that it would remain "white" would be from about the third day of drying until the first Diesel truck drove past. I agree, pure white and pure black don't exist in nature.
Regards, Greg.P.
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Greg.P. wrote:

OK. Just goes to show that NZ is weird in more than one way... :-)
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Weird because we have white sand? Now that's a weird concept.
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I'm jumping in after being absent for month or so.
For bricks I'll generally use red oxide (box car red) lightened with white to varying degrees.
Milwaukee has been known as "Cream City" since the early 20th century due to the cream-colored bricks common to the city. This is due to the chemical make-up of the local clay that was used to make the bricks. Being a rather industrial area in times past, these bricks can be found in an almost pristine cream color to stained almost black from exhaust and pollution.
Mortar around here tends to be a light gray and from a distance on the lighter cream buildings is almost unnoticeable.
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wrote:

Lots of buildings with white mortar. Check out some of the new buildings built with white brick. There are many old buildings with white mortar and...Oh , almost forgot , some of the buildings on my layout have white mortar.
Ken
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Wolf likes to disagree with anything I write!
Regards, Greg.P.

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Greg.P. wrote:

Like I said, I've never seen a white mortar - light grey, yes, but most mortar is medium grey and even darker. In fact, many mortars are coloured to harmonise with the brick, a practice that goes back many years AFAICT. That would account for the white mortar - white brick combination (or is it a very light grey?). But so far, I've not seen a bight (not even light grey) mortar combined with dark bricks. The lightest Ive seen is medium grey with blue bricks (actually, blue/dark brown variegated.)
I have seen mortar that's been _painted_ white. (I checked.) Looked ghastly, but hey, it wasn't my building.
Greg says in NZ they use a bright white sand to make mortar. I have no reason to disbelieve him. I wouldn't be surprised if some people used it with dark bricks, too. There's no accounting for taste.
Oh, I still haven't been given photographic evidence. :-)
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Wolf K wrote:
> I have seen mortar that's been _painted_ white. (I checked.) Looked > ghastly, but hey, it wasn't my building.
A practice known here in Australia as "tuckpointing". Very popular on California bungalow-style houses built just after WW1. It worked well on them but not on many other styles of dwelling I've seen it applied to.
> Greg says in NZ they use a bright white sand to make mortar. I have > no reason to disbelieve him. I wouldn't be surprised if some people > used it with dark bricks, too. There's no accounting for taste. > > Oh, I still haven't been given photographic evidence. :-)
I wouldn't hold my breath while waiting for it, either.
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Martin, you very informatively told us that in Australia there was a practice known as "tuckpointing", but you omitted to give ANY indication as to what that practice was or is. Was that simple ommission or basic stupidity?
Regards, Greg.P.
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Greg.P. wrote:
> > >> Wolf K wrote: >> >>> I have seen mortar that's been _painted_ white. (I checked.) >>> Looked ghastly, but hey, it wasn't my building. >> >> A practice known here in Australia as "tuckpointing". Very popular >> on California bungalow-style houses built just after WW1. It worked >> well on them but not on many other styles of dwelling I've seen it >> applied to. > > Martin, you very informatively told us that in Australia there was a > practice known as "tuckpointing", but you omitted to give ANY > indication as to what that practice was or is. Was that simple > ommission or basic stupidity?
Who's "Martin"? I know you're nearly blind, but can't you read message headers? Can you, in fact, read for comprehension at all?
Context, dickhead, and the Usenet convention of interleaved replies, should answer your question. Or it would, if you weren't basically stupid.
Wolf K wrote:
"I have seen mortar that's been _painted_ white. (I checked.) Looked ghastly, but hey, it wasn't my building."
and I replied, in the conventional manner;
"A practice known here in Australia as "tuckpointing"."
Do you understand *NOW*?
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Context? " >> A practice known here in Australia as "tuckpointing". "

So you're telling me Australians are stupid enough to waste their time painting the mortar between bricks. Is it any surprise I missed the context. Even I didn't think Aussies were that stupid!
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Thanks; I was pointing out to Martin, who delights in picking every possible error I make, that he is not infallible. I know the process, called "repointing" here, but never heard of tuckpointing. We don't get "This Old House" here. (so far, but I guess they'll get to it eventually )^8
Regards, Greg.P.
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Greg.P. wrote:
>> Tuckpointing is a process where disintegrating mortar is removed >> from the joints between bricks, cement blocks, rocks, tiles, etc. >> Fresh mortar is then pressed into the resulting void restoring the >> surface of the masonry to a fresh lain appearance. This is a >> standard practice in the building industry. Watch "This Old House" >> in one of it's varied appearances for further information. > > Thanks; I was pointing out to Martin, who delights in picking every > possible error I make, that he is not infallible.
And neither are you, fuckwit. Far from it.
But I *DO* manage to get your name right, and more importantly, I acknowledge those times when I'm shown to be incorrect by those with more knowledge than I have. You should try it some time...
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I never thought I was - well there was a moment back in 1967.

I'm incorrect about bricks??? I only commented on New Zealand bricks, so how wrong could I be?
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It's a little difficult to provide photographic evidence as there is very little genuine new brick structure building going on in NZ these days, in fact in my last ten days travelling 2,500km I didn't see any at all. I did work in the building industry in my student days (late '60s) and never ever saw any attempts to colour mortar, it was always white. From such a viewpoint I never considered that elsewhere builders would go to the trouble of colouring their mortar, but now you've brought it up I realise it's something I'd never bothered to consider or question! Of course white mortar weathers to off-white fairly quickly, but even weathered it's reasonably obvious that it started white or almost white. Steam train era brick buildings here didn't show white mortar, but I have no reason to think they started life as any other colour.
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I can imagine. The advantage I find in getting involved in these discussions is that once in a while I learn something - AFAIK we (NZ) don't, or didn't 50 years ago, have such practices here. Sure, there's the occassional brick house with coloured mortar in recent years, but the norm here has always been variations on red-oxide bricks and (initially near) white mortar. I assumed, without putting any great thought into the subject, that the same would hold true elsewhere. I hope the reasonable individuals here won't think too badly of me for never having put in-depth thought into foreign brickwork!
BTW, I have a small stack of yellow fire bricks, gathered up from an old lime furnace demolished nearby.
Regards, Greg.P. NZ
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