Re: Brick colored paint



Mark, old thickwit, if I supplied photos of white mortar between bricks, how would you know that they were genuine bricks and mortar and not those of some Aussie who couldn't find the airport and spent his days with a bottle of white-out beautifying his NZ house?
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wrote:

Careful what you wish for. Never know when an architect or masonry contractor may be lurking around. http://www.generalshale.com/home.php
This structure is very new and it has white mortar.
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Very creamy white that one, but nos 20 and 23 in the gallery are much closer to white. Keith
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Ken Day wrote:

Which structure? The three pix show brown and beige mortars. Just where should I click to find the building you're talking about?
Not that I doubt that some architect has specified brilliant white mortar for some building somewhere... :-)
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Ken Day wrote:

OK, I found it (I had javascript turned off). Do you mean the "rose tudor" brick house? The mortar isn't white - it's light beige or cream.
OK, who's next? I still want to see nice, bright white mortar. Or even very, very light grey mortar. :-)
Maybe I should offer a prize?
Or maybe we should form a club of mortar hunters. We'll go out every weekend and photograph brick wall, carefully lit (we'll bring along portable lights) to bring out the full splendor of the colours of the bricks and mortar. We could even a form a new newsgroup: alt.rec.insane.brick.and.mortar.kooks, anybody?
Hah!
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On Sat, 09 Sep 2006 10:09:32 -0400, Wolf K

Go to the "Face Brick" page on the same site. Plenty of close up examples there.
fl@liner
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fl@liner wrote:

[...]
[..]
OK, did that. The closest to pure white is Alpine White Antique, pale grey brick and matching mortar. Probably looks white in the right light, at least compared to nearby buildings.
Still not white.
Greg, do you have a photo of a NZ building with pure white mortar? If so, please post url, or post to alt.binaries.pictures.rail, as an OT post. Thanks.
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On Sun, 10 Sep 2006 11:33:16 -0400, Wolf K

At what temperature Kelvin do you want the lighting? However you want to pick the nit, the mortar is (some shade of) white. Live with it...
fl@liner This tagline has been certified to contain no political rants.
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On Sun, 10 Sep 2006 11:33:16 -0400, Wolf K

Here's a picture with a little text from the people who built the house in the picture. Is the light good enough ? I've drawn many plans for people who have used white brick and mortar, especially in the south.
http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/build/msg0111354114120.html?4
Incidentally, most suppliers carry white mortar. Also made with white sand here in the states just as it is anywhere else. Can't make white mortar with brown sand.
Ken

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Ken Day wrote: [...]

OK, that's white enough. :-)
Now, anyone have a pic of white mortar with red or other dark brick?
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On Wed, 13 Sep 2006 11:32:58 -0400, Wolf K

Very seldom see that combination . Sometimes inside but I don't recall ever seeing any white mortar joints with dark brick on an exterior wall. It would stain terribly with dark brick.
Ken
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wrote:

Why would the mortar stain with dark bricks??? Do you also stain your clay to produce different coloured brick?
Regards, Greg.P.
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wrote:

Of course! The red comes about during the firing process as a part of the chemical reaction. Different reds through browns towards black can be created with different temperatures and firing times, in fact it's difficult to get the same precise result twice.
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All those colour effects are relatively stable and will not stain the mortar.

Iron oxide will certainly stain mortar if water can penetrate the brick.

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The colour of mortar is not something I'd ever questioned, here in NZ it's always been white, so I've not built up a collection of photos to illustrate differences. Of course it weathers from (pure/near) white, and as far as I know there have been very few brick buildings built in the last 20 or so years. A quick check of the yellow pages shows the bricklaying craft to be approaching zero here so I'm unlikely to find any new examples. One can get bricklike facings, but I wouldn't stoop to photographing those as evidence. 8^)
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(Hokitika - Hokkaido is in Japan 8^)
You were on the west coast of the South Island. Those areas (I'm there right now) are a long way and a number of mountain passes from more dense population so heavier building materials such as tiles, bricks and blocks are more expensive than locally produced timber and cement. Typically homes here are timber framed and clad, with corrigated iron rooves. Brick buildings are uncommon.

Most likely that is "stucco", a concrete plaster applied to a timber clad building to reduce painting requirements. My own home is poured concrete, 6" thick. An unusual method of construction.

Brick houses aren't uncommon in city areas or near rural brickworks, but concrete blocks arrived in the 1950s and steadily replaced brick in new construction. I can't recall seeing a new brick house in 20 years. However, bricks are readily available at hardware outlets so I guess there must be some somewhere.
Off the top of my head, I'd guess at 1 in 25 houses are brick in Christchurch. (that's one word BTW, no second emphasis on the first ch of church)
Regards, Greg.P.
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