Re: The Switching Problem (was Correct American Terminology)



W R O N G.
In North America, a siding is a place named in the time-table where trains meet or pass each other.
A stub ended track, either industrial or in a yard is a _spur_ NOT a siding. "Siding" is what model railroaders frequently and incorrectly call "spurs".
Even an industrial track connected at both ends to the mainline yet not named in the time-table and not used for passing or meeting trains is a double connected spur, it is still not a siding, even though it looks like one.
-- Cheers
Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra /
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Thanks for the snipped parts. All very helpful.
The only problem is that *I* understand that it is common to use the word 'engine' for loco, BUT in the UK it was also common to use the word for steam engines until diesels were introduced. That's when the word 'loco' had to be used. AS I'm using diesels I thought I'd keep that terminology, but I could just use the term 'switcher' as that's what will be doing the work

--
Mike Hughes
A Taxi driver licensed for London and Brighton
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A "spur", by definition, is single connected.
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Greg.P. wrote:
>>> >>> The sidings are not very large.............. >> >> W R O N G. >> >> In North America, a siding is a place named in the time-table where >> trains meet or pass each other. >> >> A stub ended track, either industrial or in a yard is a _spur_ NOT >> a siding. "Siding" is what model railroaders frequently and >> incorrectly call "spurs". >> >> Even an industrial track connected at both ends to the mainline yet >> not named in the time-table and not used for passing or meeting >> trains is a double connected spur, it is still not a siding, even >> though it looks like one.
> A "spur", by definition, is single connected.
Context, ya dickhead.
"In *NORTH AMERICA*, a siding is a place named in the time-table where trains meet or pass each other."
Notice that, dickhead? North America. Not New Zealand, Germany, or Calathumpia. North America.
Spare us your usual pretentious bullshit about "English" vs. "english" - the question refers *SPECIFICALLY* to North America usage. Nothing else is relevant.
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Did you happen to notice that I made _no_ mention or comment regarding sidings?

Given that I made no comment regarding sidings nor about English vs english, the appelation of "dickhead" might better be directed to you.
Regards, Greg.P.
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