Correct American terminology

I'm putting together some instructions for use with my (very basic) 'timesaver' layout that will be going to a show soon and I need help
with some correct terms.
In the UK we use the term 'shunter' meaning someone who couples and uncouples the waggons (cars). What is the correct American equivalent?
Would this person be the one who would be responsible for telling the driver (engineer) where and when to stop during the shunting process.
When I've completed the instructions I'll post them here to see if they make sense.
TIA
--
Mike Hughes
A Taxi driver licensed for London and Brighton
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wrote:

Engine driver = engineer Shunting engine = switch engine/switcher
Shunting = switching Shunter = switchman
This terminology is somewhat dated, but is fine for use up to about the mid-eighties. Presently there are usually only two people on a crew, the engineer and the conductor. The engineer operates the locomotive in accordance with instructions from the crewmember executing the movement out on the ground.
Charles
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Charles Crocker spake thus:

So what is a "hostler" (hosteler?)? And is there a name for the person who attends to a switch? Wouldn't *they* be the "switchman"?
--
Napoleon won the battle of Waterloo. The German Wehrmacht won World War
II. The United States won in Vietnam, and the Soviets in Afghanistan.
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wrote:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hostler
<quote> The word, recorded since c.1386, meaning "one who tends to horses at an inn," also, occasionally, "innkeeper", is sometimes jokingly said to be derived from "oat-stealer", but is actually derived from Anglo-French hostiler (modern French hostelier), itself from the Medieval Latin hostilarius "the monk who entertains guests at a monastery," from hospitale "inn" (compare hospital).
Other uses In a more modern usage, since horse riding became uncommon for functional travel, "hostler" is the 'analogous' title for a railroad employee qualified to move locomotives while in a yard or shops complex, but not on the main line. </quote>

Yup.
Grin, Stein
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

The hostler takes over from the road engineer and runs the loco into and around the engine terminal for servicing; (s)he also brings it out to the ready track for the road crew to pick up.
The switchman does attend to the switches. If there's major (re)classification going on, there will be two or more switchmen. They pull the pins on the couplers (the pin prevents the knuckle from opening), and throw the switches as required. The engine may not move unless and until signalled by the switchman. In the GODs that was hand signals by day and lanterns at night. Nowadays, it's radio. This applies only to a manually switched yard, of course.
BTW, the conductor (guard) is in charge of the train on the mainline, and is responsible for any switching that's done between terminals. I've seen conductors throw switches when necessary.
HTH
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Wolf K spake thus:

So it's the hostler who drives the "yard goat" around the yard, right?
--
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II. The United States won in Vietnam, and the Soviets in Afghanistan.
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wrote:

Not usually. The switcher engineer drives the "yard goat" around the yard. The hostler is more like a 'valay' parking attendent.

--
Robert Heller -- 978-544-6933
Deepwoods Software -- Linux Installation and Administration
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No. The hostler, as previously explained, is a person who is qualified only to move locomotives around the area defined as the "engine terminal". A hostler does nothing other than move light engines. S/he moves them from the inbound track to be sanded and fuelled, into and out of the roundhouse or shop, s/he m.u.s them or breaks up the m.u. consist and finally to the outbound track for the road crew to pick up. In other words, the hostler is responsible for all the servicing movements of locomotives.
This is unlike other countries, where only a fully qualified engineer/driver (Or fireman in steam days) is permitted to move any locomotive and it is considered a "driving shift" in UKese.
A "yard goat" is one of several slang names for a switcher/shunter locomotive. When switching and operating outside the area defined as the "engine terminal", it will be operated by a fully qualified road engineer/driver.
-- Cheers
Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra /
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A fully qualified engineer would more likely spend his time designing and building bridges, buildings etc rather than mucking about with locomotives. ;-)
/driver

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Greg.P. spake thus:

Oh, come off it. Yes, we *GET IT* that you over yonder call them "drivers", OK? Do you really think this is the term that God intended us to use, and therefore "engineer" is somehow wrong? Sheesh.
--
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II. The United States won in Vietnam, and the Soviets in Afghanistan.
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As usual you're grasping the wrong end of the stick!
"Engineer", like "Doctor" or "Barrister" etc is a profession. One can translate English "Engine driver" to US "Engineer" but one cannot readily translate US "Engineer" to English "Engine driver". Even context, unless it is very specific, guarentees the correct translation. Try to think before leaping on your hobby-horse. The term "engineer" was used.
Regards, Greg.P.
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The original poster asked, while stating that he wasn't conversant with US terminology. If it was an answer directed to me then yes you could assume wilful blindness as a response to stupidity, but in this case I'm merely pointing out that the two terms are NOT equal.
As you said yourself (mistakenly, evidently) above, "...

Railways employ both engine drivers and engineers - context in this case does not neccessarily clarify the situation. In English* speaking countries, the use of the term "engineer" firstly brings to mind the person carrying a slide-rule, not a piece of oily cotton waste. It's only when one knows that US english speakers misuse the term to mean locomotive drivers that one can translate back.
Regards, Greg.P. *("English speakers" : those whose language comes from England of the last two centuries) ("english speakers" : those whose language branched prior to about 1800 ie USa)
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David Nebenzahl wrote:

LOL!
Well put, David.
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Sure, but what would you term a "locomotive engineer"?
The posting I commented on said: "Engine driver = Engineer." without further comment or context. (UK) Engine driver translates to (US) Engineer, but (US) Engineer does not translate to (UK) Engine driver, it translates to Engineer unless you specify the context. Therefore, while the statement will make sense to any yank, it may well be confusing to everyone else.
Regards, Greg.P.
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My point was that the terms, in many countries, are defined terms for specific professions. One may not legally term oneself to be "doctor", "solicitor", "barrister", "engineer" and etc in many countries without having the requisite degrees etc.
Regards, Greg.P.
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Aren't they all?
Regards, Greg.P.
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degrees
Not really Greg, historically anyone could call themselves an engineer ie military or civil ( from the railway era!) Old Stephenson hisself werent nay eddicated suvvern layabout (sorry for the rendering of a Northern dialect!) a doctor historically (medical) was half the time an ignorant homicidally enthusiastic maniac and as for the legal proffession....well..... as sober a a judge was a very sarcastic term considering the amount of English judges who collapsed under the desk during trials due to acute drunkeness, WE both know what he meant so why nitpick on a genuine railway discussion, far better to call Blair and Bush for what they are and enjoy the resultant OT argument than to sour a good thread filled with interesting and educational snippets.
Beowulf
If Bush is so clever how come he invaded Iraq when Bin Laden is a Saudi Arabian from the Yemen?
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I made one simple nitpicking comment and I get jumped on by numerous incompetent pedants. I'm not including you there :-)
far better to call Blair and Bush for what

The respondees to my Bush/Blair comments (elsewhere) are even more wallyish than ...

I'm sure OBL is installed in a Manhatten penthouse close to the medical care he needs. Either that or he's in Cuba getting real medical attention.
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They still use hand signals, especially if there's alot of radio chatter. Also, there's another case of a person handling switches called a switchtender. Usually these are for a temporary situation (trackwork, signal upgrades, etc, where a normally power controlled switch must be run manually)
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On Sun, 17 Sep 2006 16:53:27 -0400, Wolf K

If you are referring to someone who stays in a fixed position and throws switches this person is referred to as a switch tender. There are few if any such jobs on North American railroads today, these jobs were usually held by older or partly disabled workers.
A switchman is part of a yard crew usually consisting of a foreman, one or more switchmen and the engineman (driver) in CN terms these crews are usually called by the time they go on duty and location. (ie: 16 o'clock hump job, which is the crew going on duty at 16:00 and shoving cars up the 'hump' of the hump yard, or 7 o'clock Industrial zone 'A', again the time on duty (07:00) and the crews assigned work area) Other railroads have different terms and also jobs get nicknames.

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