Scale names

From having fired and driven all three surviving NSWGT tram motors, 28A, 100 and 103A.
Yes, conventional steam locomotives are obviously noisier than electric trams. But this is just another of your beloved straw-man arguments, since no-one claimed otherwise.
Steam *TRAM* locomotives were specifically designed to run quietly, and had a number of features intended to minimise the noise. They are probably comparable with electric cars of the period for noise.
Reply to
mark_newton
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Where have you been Terry. 103a is almost close to fully operational. and Is looking better than ever. If you dont believe me come up to Valley Heights on the 3rd sunday of the month. I should know, I am an active member there.
Reply to
Greg Rudd
Last time I saw 103A it was a nothing but a sorry collection of metal. Allowed to be burnt was bad. As usual you descend into the gutter with your disgusting language. I retract my statement about 103A. I was thinking of the look a like with the diesel guts. Considering the short piece of track available to run on at the time, you would have no first hand idea of it's maximum speed, not that it is that fast, or quiet. Just a small simple 0-4-0 in a disguise.
Reply to
Terry Flynn
Sure Mark. And when and where did you fire and drive the power house museums tram motor?. So you had a ride on the footplate of the one in New Zealand. Don't exaggerate. I've been there. No big grades to see how noisy they are under load on any location that could to have run these hard. Wether you drove or fired these is irrelevant. You can hear how loud they are from the track side.
You effectivally did above. So much for the accuracy of your beat up comment.
The noise levels from the exhaust is no different from any contemporary like sized locomotive. I don't see any major difference between these Baldwin's main exhaust arrangements and that of other conventional locomotives. Still nosier than electric trams, consistent with historic complaints about noise.
Reply to
Terry Flynn
Terry, Where have you been. 103a Is near fully operational status an in many ways even now she is looking better than ever. If you dont believe me take a trip up to Valley Heights on the third Sunday of the month.
Reply to
Greg Rudd
I tell you what Terry. Come up some time and check it out for yourself.
Really, What a load of cock and bull. You are really going to the bottom of the barrel here. The fire was a result of an arson attack but if you have any new information. I suggest you contact the police with this new information that you have.
Terry, Where have you been. 103a Is near fully operational status an in many ways even now she is looking better than ever. If you dont believe me take a trip up to Valley Heights on the third Sunday of the month.
Reply to
Greg Rudd
I tell you what Terry. Come up some time and check it out for yourself. What are you trying to be a comedian??? ;-)
Really, What a load of cock and bull. You are really going to the bottom of the barrel here. The fire was a result of an arson attack. But if you have any new information,I suggest you contact the police.
Terry, Where have you been. 103a Is near fully operational status and in many ways even now she is looking better than ever. If you dont believe me take a trip up to Valley Heights on the third Sunday of the month.
Reply to
Greg Rudd
I remember when it was stored at the RTM Thirlmere and they used to steam 103A up and down the museum complex, the steam trams did have a good speed to them, and regarding looking like a diesel, well even with the wooden carbody over the boiler, it didn't look like a diesel.
Again Flynn demonstrating on how big of a retard he actually is.Maybe he should submit himself for a drug test because obviously he's taking or smoking something.Or maybe just born like that.
Nathan
Reply to
Nathan & Rebecca Cox
When it was being trialled on the loop-line after being rebuilt by the RTM. I believe it was written up in "Roundhouse".
No, I was an invited guest at MOTAT for 100s re-launch on April 13, 1996. I lit-up, fired and drove throughout that weekend.
The ruling grade from Great North Road to the terminus at the Zoo is about 1 in 25, IIRC. Is that not big enough? Nor is the rest of the on-street trackage flat.
It's entirely relevant. You asked how I know how much noise they make, stating that I had no first-hand experience of them. I do.
I did no such th"Definitely a beat-up. The *motors* are very quiet in operation, even when steaming hard."
and:
Steam *TRAM* locomotives were specifically designed to run quietly, and had a number of features intended to minimise the noise. They are probably comparable with electric cars of the period for noise.
Produce your evidence.
Produce your evidence.
Produce your evidence.
Reply to
mark_newton
What exactly does that mean, "Allowed to be burnt was bad"? Are you *that* desparate to score points that you're alleging I colluded with the person responsible for destroying our collection? Even by your miserable standards, that's low.
Slightly more than a kilometre. About the average distance between tram stops on the NSWGT steam lines. Quite adequate to demonstrate it's performance. How much more track would you recommend?
Really? How much more first hand can you get than firing and driving the loco in question? The park was not the only location we ran the thing, as you ought to be aware. It was trialled extensively on the loop line after it's rebuild at Thirlmere. All of which was well documented at the time - there is even a video available which includes footage of the trial trips, I believe.
A disguise that incorporated muffled safety valves, muffled brake ejector exhaust, a heavily lagged smokebox, a multiple orifice blastpipe cap, and sound absorbent material on the skirts and lower cab sides, all with intention of minimising noise. But then, you knew all that.
Reply to
mark_newton
As I have said in a previous post if Terrance has any new evidence he should report it to the Police. And if that is what the guy is really alleging I would say that you have a pretty good defermation case.
I will be interested to know when and if Terry Flynn will make the trip up to Valley Heights to see the same tram motor and replacement trailer car.
Reply to
Greg Rudd
operational.
Nathan, . I retracted my comments about 103A having a diesel inside. You and Greg should learn to read. There is no way running up and down the museum yard is going to achieve maximum speed.
Reply to
Terry Flynn
And it all had minimal effect on reducing exhaust noise. Multiple orifice blast pipes are used to improve draught, if anything it will increase noise. Lagging on the smoke box is their to stop the crew from getting burnt expert. Minimal impact on noise. Noise from the exhaust stack is well above the closed section of the tram body, again having minimal impact on exhaust noise. The skirts covering the side rods were a safety feature, felt on the inside has minimal impact on noise levels. If the trams were not noisy, the attempts to quieten the tram would not have been tried. Still much nosier than an electric tram, which makes minimal noise above wheel rail noise. Still just a simple 0-4-0 in disguise. Clearly you need to clean the soot from out of your ears.
Reply to
Terry Flynn
Amazing you were able to keep the fire alight, then again, a small fire.
Big load was it?
On one weekend on a short tourist line, the rest, nothing much more than a sidings length of track. It's still irrelevant, as you have not compared these runs directly with alternative traction.
Which is untrue. They make plenty of noise.
But they are nosier compared to electric trams and horses of the period..
See below
No difference is no difference. Where is the exhaust muffler?
Clean the soot out of your ears and get your hearing checked expert.
Reply to
Terry Flynn

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