Slip Switch Track

wrote:


If I have 2 blocks east separated by insulators, can I include the device in the two blocks west (like a crossover) or should I make it a miniblock? (isolated from other blocks)
Jim Stewart
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On Tue, 4 May 2004 10:33:40 -0500, "Jim Stewart"

How you arrange blocks depends on the functions of the various tracks and where they go to next. so you can do either of these depending on circumstances. I would not expect to see the arrangement you describe in running lines, the double slip usually occurs in combination with other formations. However if all the tracks, two east and two west are through running lines then it may be appropriate to have a seperate mini block for the slip. I would arrange it to be fed from two of the other blocks, east or west depending on switch settings to avoid an extra block selector on the panel. If some of the tracks are sidings it may well be better to feed the sidings in self isolating fashion reducing block selectors still further. And with dcc eliminate blocks altogether and just have the basic frog switching.
Keith Make friends in the hobby. Visit <http://www.grovenor.dsl.pipex.com/ Garratt photos for the big steam lovers.
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wrote:

miniblock?
Perhaps you need to know more about my application. I am building a four track station (aka Newark, NJ) but not with as much trackage. I was going to have the four converge into two mainlines with double crossovers between (Remember I said I am trying to do this round the wall in a 10x10 room) the two mains feed back into the other end of the station. Now I have decided to add a lead to each pair of station tracks. I want to have a crossover at the center of this lead to the start of the other pair. This could be two back to back turnouts or a double crossover in a traditional tight spot on passenger inlet to station. I am using tight radius for passenger (18 inches) but intend to cover most of the turns with city scenery. (No, not the turnouts.) ultimately, I want to play with (experiment) CTC for having each track be bydirectional. I have students who are drooling over such a control project using ladder logic and a manufacturer who would like to see how it is done. I also want to prototype signal for Penn 1942.....That is a major research project, yet....
I do not want to go with DCC because the blocks will make control easior for this instance. When I have a real basement, club room, etc then I can modify this test road into a module. The design is being built ultra light so that it can be moved as 3 by 8 foot units. It will sit on four 6 foot tables so most of the serious framing will not be required.
If this is a little incoherent, I have 250 students who expect their papers for the semester all to be graded by tomorrow...It is high stress time for a 64 year old....
Jim Stewart
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On Wed, 5 May 2004 23:51:29 -0500, "Jim Stewart"

Jim, I'm not sure I have a clear picture of how these 'leads' are meant to connect. Its probably better to take this discussion off group so we can exchange drawings. Does your email addy in here work?
Keith Make friends in the hobby. Visit <http://www.grovenor.dsl.pipex.com/ Garratt photos for the big steam lovers.
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" snipped-for-privacy@CreditValley.Railway" wrote:

Trunk and Hood in English are a big suitcase and the folding roof cover on a convertable.

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Paul Welsh wrote:

OK, I'll throw a (US) term in for you to play with: "Railroad" vs "Railway". I read a discussion in MR magazine in the late '60s or early '70s - the bottom line was that around a third of US rail systems were called "Railways" - the US hobby now universally calls them "Railroads" - what happened?

It doesn't exist, but once a group like the NMRA creates a standard for terminology the diversity begins to die.

What is a "switchman"? (I genuinely don't know what the precise position is)

If you think it important that those reading should understand, then yes.

I'm a New Zealander modelling old time German railroads - I'm arguing _for_ diversity of language. (and descriptive terms if they must be standardised)
Regards, the one and only Greg.P. Takaka, NZ.
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Gregory Procter wrote:

I think the hobby followed the prototype, but why did the industry do this?--I don't know. Either is a descriptive term, though, and not likely to cause confusion.

An interesting example. The term is descriptive in that it defines a job where the person has something to do with switches. It could be a switch repairman, a towerman that throws switches at an interlocking, or what I did, or something else.
I was a member of the Switchmen's Union of North America. I pulled the uncoupling levers on cars, applied/released hand brakes, threw switches (turnouts) on the ground, gave hand signals to the locomotive engineer (locomotive driver in the U.K. and, perhaps, elsewhere) to direct his movements, etc. Some folks in North America would call this a "brakeman's" (another descriptive term) job, and it was. The difference was: a switchmen worked only within the yard limits and the brakemen only outside the yard limits. So the difference in terminology was a creation of the North American labor unions and unlikely to be carried to other countries.
I believe that in the U.K., "brakemen" are called "guards," but not sure if there is an equivalent to "switchmen." I'm not even sure the terms "switchman" and "brakeman" are used on prototype railroads in the U.S./Canada any more. I understand "brakemen" are now called "assistance engineers" on at least one railroad.
I have no clue what terminology might be used in New Zealand.

In general I agree, but it must be done very sparingly and only if the term is central to the argument. Look how much text it to explain "switchman" although it could be reduced for a quicky definition. Mostly we must depend upon readers to know the lingo.

I tend to agree, but the context of the usage is very important. For railroad workers and those operating on my layout, I think there is a certain charm to calling a cubical diesel shop "the roundhouse." This term was originally used to describe the circular buildings, built around turntables, used to house steam engines. The "roundhouse" became "the place where they house locomotives" rather than a describer of the shape of a building. In fact, "the roundhouse" may include the fuel track, the ready track, or any other track that is designated just for locomotives. If I write an article for a prototype railroad journal, I would not use the term "roundhouse" and would confine the term "diesel shop" to the building used to repair and inspect locomotives.
One supposedly descriptive term that I would like to see die is "wide cab" because it is purports to be descriptive, but is a lie. "Wide cab" locomotives are the same width inside and out as any other cab.
Paul Welsh
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...............<snip>............

I have often asked users of the term "wide cab" if a locomotive with a wide cab can pass another that also has a wide cab, or even if a wide cab can pass a "regular" cab locomotive. One fellow responded that the wide cabs are wider ~INSIDE~ and have much more room inside. I asked him if he had somehow confused a locomotive with a tardis, but I don't think he knew what I meant. LOL! Same size outside, but much larger inside. Neat trick eh? Those lads at EMD are always coming up with them.
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Paul Welsh wrote:

Sounds to me like you were a "yard(s)man".

The "guard" is the senior member of the train crew.

New Zealand railways used a mix of US, British and homegrown technology but organisationally the terminology mostly came from Britain. Westinghouse brakes became standard so long before I existed that "breakmen" and the like were long forgotten.
Of course, your explanation brings up new queations - "interlocking" and "tower" are, I assume, a "signal box"? Why two different names?

We call them all "Loco depots".

I agree, but you're about as likely to see that one disappear as I am to see "consist" disappear.
At long last, the English speaking modellers are dropping "points" to describe "turnouts", a mis-term that was given by tinplate manufacturers way back in the 1900s!
Regards, Greg.P.
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"Gregory Procter"

describe "turnouts", a

AFAIK, UK railwaymen still call 'em "points" and North American railroaders still call 'em "switches".
It's only the model press and model railroaders that seem to call 'em "turnouts". And non-operating staff on railways.
-- Cheers Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra /
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I believe that was an NMRA started convention. Switches are electric switches for throwing turnouts. Turnouts are pieces of railway track that branch into two lines and are controlled electrically by switches.
--
Will
N Scale - Credit Valley Railway
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:~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ To the NMRA when the railway already has a term that all railroaders use.
"Switches" they are, and "Switches" they will remain.
If you want to call something by a name, call electrical switches, "toggles".
Like those weird hand signals the NMRA created rather than using railroad hand signals.
-- Cheers Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra /
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snipped-for-privacy@CreditValley.Railway wrote:

(snip)
If that's the case, then what's the correct name for a point/switch/turnout (strike out whichever term/s you disagree with) where the controlling mechanism is either mechanical (rods and linkages) or manual (whacking your finger into the middle of the track and changing the alignment)?
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Roy Wilke wrote:

One moves the points to realign the turnout. - works in both English and US cases.
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On the Southern Railway (US) we referred to them as either turnouts or switches. Use was indiscriminate. A replacement "switch" rode to the jobsite on a specially constructed "turnout" car.
Go figure................F>
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"Roger T." wrote:

Bother!
Well, buying a "set of points" in a model shop might result in a smaller package than if you ask for a "turnout". Asking for a "switch" might result in anything from a list of goods known as "switches". Probably operating staff of railways rarely go to the railway shop to make the full size purchase.
Regards, Greg.P.
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If you purchase a set of points in North America, you have something to install into your automobile's ignition system. If you go to the hobby store/model train shop and ask for a switch, you will have to clarify whether you want a track switch (turnout) or an electrical switch (toggle, rotary, etc.). If you ask for a set of points a member of the staff will, most likely, refer you to the nearest auto parts store. If you ask for a turnout, you will probably get what you want.
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1900s!
railroaders
install into

will have to

(toggle,
refer you to

Who mentioned auto parts?
We're talking railroading, or at the least, model railroading and every railroader and or model railroader should know what a "switch" is. It ain't electrical, unless you say "On/Off Switch". Plain ole "switch" to a railroader is something that you go "throw", or "get", or "line" plus, I'm sure, several more local terms.
-- Cheers Roger T.
Home of the Great Eastern Railway http://www.highspeedplus.com/~rogertra /
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I did. A set of points is something for your automobile.
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Roger T. wrote:

Not to PUSH anyone's BUTTONS, but in a MOMENTARY lapse of PCness I went to a bar to see a DWARF tossing exhibition. Instead it was wrestling night, and the TAG team action featuring Big Eddie Kulikowski was fierce, with SINGLE POLE DOUBLE THROWS until he managed to TOUCH his partner and then we were treated to a beautifully choreographed DOUBLE POLE DOUBLE THROW, but it soon REVERSEd into a THREE-WAY until the referee made them STOP.
Luckily no one pulled a KNIFE, not even a teeny tiny little MICRO one - there are LIMITS.
--
Steve Caple

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