tortoise switch machine info needed

I am getting ready to build my N-scale around-the-room shelf 'empire' and
need some help. I plan to use the tortoise slow motion switch machines for
all turn-outs that will not be hand-thrown. At this point, it looks like the
completed project will use 30 - 35 of the Tortoise switch machines. The
layout will be wired for DCC. Toggle switches will be used to control the
switch machines. Red and Green LEDs will be mounted in the fascia board
next to the toggles to indicate turnout position.
Here is the question. How large of a stand-alone 12V DC power supply do I
need to power the Tortoise machines? Assume that the power supply will be
dedicated for switch control only. I know that the Tortoises draw a small
current while at 'rest', which needs to be factored in, as well as the
current drawn when active. In some cases, two machines will be controlled
by the same toggle switch. In other cases, up to 5 switch machines could be
active at the same time as routes through the staging yard and train make-up
yard are selected.
Input would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks.
....Fred
Reply to
Fred E. Lux
Loading thread data ...
At 20ma (miliamps) each, (0.020 amps) 35 Tortoises will require 700ma. A 1 amp 12 vdc wallwart will be more than adequate.
Dale.
Fred E. Lux wrote:
Reply to
Dale Gloer
: I am getting ready to build my N-scale around-the-room shelf 'empire' and : need some help. I plan to use the tortoise slow motion switch machines for : all turn-outs that will not be hand-thrown. At this point, it looks like the : completed project will use 30 - 35 of the Tortoise switch machines. The : layout will be wired for DCC. Toggle switches will be used to control the : switch machines. Red and Green LEDs will be mounted in the fascia board : next to the toggles to indicate turnout position. : : Here is the question. How large of a stand-alone 12V DC power supply do I : need to power the Tortoise machines? : ....Fred :
Fred, Tortoii draw 20 ma max; 35 of them is 700 ma. I'd get a couple of 8 or 9 volt DC output wall warts - here's a source & example:
formatting link
9 Vdc 1 amp 2.5mm co-ax positive C DCTX-9101 4.00
Wire them in series so the total output is around 18 volts - with a center tap. Run the 18 volts to the outside terminals of your DPDT control switches (SPST works fine here too), and the center terminal to one motor terminal (1 or 8) of each Tortoise. Next, run one wire from the other Tortoise motor terminal to the center pole of the control switch to be related to that turnout. You can put a bi-color LED (or separate red and green LEDs in anti-parallel) in series with the motor and switch if you want for an indicator.
If the 9 volts throws the Tortoise too quickly, experiment with various resistors in series with the control lead.
Reply to
KTØT
I am installing Tortoise motors at the club I belong to. I am using Radio Shack 1000 miliwatt 15 volt DC transformer/wall wart. I have 27 motors on one wart. I do not have any LEDs or lights attached to this, as this is a temporary set up while the computer electronics are being installed.
Reply to
Frank A. Rosenbaum
.......Fred
There is a couple things that you may need to know. You will need two power supplies one to provide Positive voltages and one to provide negative voltages. You can hook up the out puts of the two power supplies per the Tortoise instruction sheet. Tortoise switch motors are a stall type devise in other words the power is applied constantly so you are drawing the 20 mil amps constantly. To activate numerous turnouts in a chain to direct them you would need a diode matrix.
Hope this info is helpful.
Reply to
Jerry Barnes
On Fri, 16 Apr 2004 16:40:24 UTC, "Jerry Barnes" wrote: 2000
You do not need two power supplies to control a tortoise although it is a perfectly acceptable solution. You can use a unipolar supply with a DPDT switch to control the direction. With two supplies you can use an SPDT switch.
You can connect a bipolar LED in series with the tortoise motor to give you the direction indication. This allows you to use a lower current supply since no extra current is required for the LED.
Reply to
Ernie Fisch
You might consider using DCC accessory decoders like the North Coast Engineering SWITCH-IT or the CVP's AD4. Then, you won't need any additional power supplies. It uses the "always on" power from the DCC bus (if you can afford to "lose" the 1 amp from your other DCC needs). You'll also be able to control from your DCC unit or by computer as well as by external switches. And, as someone else mentioned, you can put LEDs in series to give you position indication.
I haven't done this yet, but it's the direction I plan to go. I'm expecting that some day I'll want to have some computer control in parallel with my manual control to run the trains. This will set the stage for that.
Vince
"Fred E. Lux" wrote in news: snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com:
Reply to
Vince Guarna

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.