Amanco restoration, Help

I have decided to "re-restore" the Amanco Hired Man I bought from EBay,
(incidentally Martin, it came from the same guy in Wisbech you sold your
Bradford to), and document the restoration on my web site as I did the
Fuller & Johnson a couple of years ago.
I have a problem however, as although not strictly necessary, I would like
to remove the flywheels. Looking at the mag side there appears to be a
shoulder in the crankshaft stopping the removal of the key. Pictures are at
formatting link
if anyone has any thoughts, I
would appreciate hearing them. Incidentally, Keith Smigle who has a rapidly
expanding web site on Associated Engines (see the link from my site) thinks
the groove should be continuous and will email me some picture when he
returns tonight from a 1400 mile round trip to pick up a Chore Boy.....and
we think we go to silly lengths to procure our "little babies" as Jan calls
them.
Thanks in advance for any advice.
Reply to
Pete Aldous
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Has someone filled the keyway with weld or just filed off the key head? By the looks of the paint in the mains they don't fit very well either? ttfn Roland
Reply to
Roland and Celia Craven
I thought it may have been the key head filed of however taking a file to the crank reveals no join so maybe it is weld. I think the paint in the mains was an over enthusiastic restorer, maybe removing the paint may take up the small amount of lateral movement ;-)
Reply to
Pete Aldous
What I was trying to say was that the paint that is un-wiped suggests the mains may be ill-fitting. Is wear taken up by shims behind the bearings and re-scraping?? ttfn Roland
Reply to
Roland and Celia Craven
Hmm, I will have to look at it carefully when I re-assemble it.
Thanks for the thought.
Reply to
Pete Aldous
Pete,
Looks as though someone has tried to peg in a loose key to me. My hired man has a headless key on this side which gets some abuse from the typically crude Amanco starting handle. I would suggest finding a piece of pipe slightly larger than the crank and knocking the flywheel onto the crank towards the big end to release the key, if you get the flywheel on far enough the key should be able to be lifted out, then you can look at remachining the keyway and making good.
HTH Regards
Dan
Reply to
Dan Howden
Thanks for that Dan, I will do some further investigation at the weekend
Reply to
Pete Aldous
Yes, I had thought of that and if I do indeed decide to go that route, I will nip down to the local engineers and get them to clamp it up. To be honest though it probably is not worth too much effort as I should be able to fit it up and paint the flywheels etc. in situ.
Thanks.
Reply to
Pete Aldous
If you are contemplating knocking the flywheel further on the crankshaft, it would pay to fit a block of wood between the crank throws to prevent springing the crank, preferably secured by a clamp or such.
Tom
Reply to
Tom

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