BSA Charging Sets

We have, by a roundabout way, got hold of the details of a guy in Lancashire who
apparently still has 10 ex-army BSA sets in good inhibited condition, with
exhaust, manual, toolkit, starting rope, charging lead etc.
He is asking £100 each for them.
We are not involved in any way, we were looking for spares.
Contact me for more details if you are interested..
Peter
--
Peter & Rita Forbes
Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk
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Reply to
Peter A Forbes
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That's still very expensive for one but better than the £250 I found yesterday on the net.
Martin P
Reply to
campingstoveman
Just for clarification, when we speak of "BSA charging sets", I take it we mean the inclined, air-cooled, all cast iron SV single cylinder engines originated by Johnson in the USA before WW2?
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I have several & when others fail, this will always start on the button & run all day on a little ancient petrol.
Prices are slowly rising & between £50 & £70 is not unusual now for an example complete with it's wire frame. My life is now complete in that I have eventually found an example that generates 230volts AC - not sure if it actually does, mind!
regards,
Kim Siddorn
"campingstoveman" wrote
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
Yes, these are the 30V 10A versions, of which we now have 3 and Martin also has one.
Pretty simple and robust little units.
Peter -- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk
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Reply to
Peter A Forbes
I have the slightly more unusual 12v 20a canadian WW2 version here if you want to make up the full set. Handy for car batteries.
Reply to
crn
I'm very interested in finding a small, lightweight 12V charging set. I suffer from sleep apnea so always have to bring my CPAP when camping. It will run off a 12V battery and it would be nice to be able to recharge in the field. My 230V genset is a bit overkill size and weight wise. How big/heavy are these BSA sets?
Michael
Reply to
michaelbrix
I found a manual on the 'net. Nice and compact (15x15x14") but heavy - 100lbs. I'd still like to get my hands on one though and if it's a 30V version then I guess a suitable dump load could be used to charge 12V batteries. Kim, any idea where I find the =A350 ones? ;-)
Michael
Reply to
michaelbrix
A 750w two stroke genset will be smaller and lighter (40lbs or less). Th= ey all(?) have a 12v DC battery charging output of a few amps. Should be ab= le to get one for =A360 or so.
No where near as interesting though.
Reply to
Dave Liquorice
100lbs? Good Lord above, they don't weigh that much - I can lug one from garage to back of car with a bit of a grunt, negotiating doorways, steps and through the house. They are certainly on the heavy side, but I'd have said about 50-60lbs.
If they DO weigh that much, I'm a lot stronger than I thought!!
Modern two stroke Chinese gennies are about from time to time for as little as £49.99. The 750 watt versions have a 12 volt facility but it is an expensive way of charging a battery. Have you considered a solar panel - quieter too.
regards,
Kim Siddorn
A 750w two stroke genset will be smaller and lighter (40lbs or less). They all(?) have a 12v DC battery charging output of a few amps. Should be able to get one for £60 or so.
No where near as interesting though.
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
110lbs is best part of 1cwt. Cement etc comes in 25kg (50lb 1/2 cwt ish)= bags these days how does one of those compare?
Chinese 2 stroke expensive way of charging a battery? More so than a BSA= set? Assuming roughly equal capital costs. The 2 stroke will have 230v a= s well...
Needs to be big (aka expensive) and have good light to get a decent char= ge current. A small =A320 ish panel is OK for keeping a lead acid battery topped up but it would take for ever to actually charge one.
Reply to
Dave Liquorice
I have one of those. Mine only has 230V output so I would need to bring a charger as well. Noisy beast and not very interesting.
Ha, with the amount of sunshine we get in this country I would suffocate in my sleep due to a flat battery. I do have a 40VA panel but they are not easy to transport. A portable waterwheel would be more appropriate ;-)
Michael
Reply to
michaelbrix
Wasn't there a lightweight 12V charger using the JAP 2A engine? I seem to remember one directly coupled to a 12V generator with a built in control panel. About 18inches long, 12 inches wide and 18inches high. Easily lifted by the young (12ish) lad who was displaying it.
Fred
Fred
Reply to
g6zru
They are a bit uncomfortable to pick up and carry, but manageable for short distances. That frame is solid steel bar, not tube, and the fuel tank/base is all cast as well.
Peter -- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk
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Reply to
Peter A Forbes
Affectionately known as a "Trolley Acc." IIRC. Nice little machine,ran like a clock but not exactly lightweight! I had one which would have filled the bill. It was a Sachs 2 stroke close coupled to a "Conyers" 12v genny, in a little tubular frame. Real lightweight. One hand job, but it was a noisy little bugger!! Sadly it's one I didn't keep a photo of.
Reply to
Charles Hamilton
There is also the ALCO Featherweight which is a tall, rangy beast, noisy and far bigger about than it needs to be. Light enough to stagger about with though.
regards,
Kim Siddorn
"g6zru" < wrote
Reply to
Kim Siddorn

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