Lister CS...Urgent advice needed........Emergency Stop

Hope to try cranking up my CS this weekend. I have overhauled the pump (totally seized...rack bent so it needed doing), and I have not
run it before.
Concern now is that it may be assembled wrong. Everything looked OK although some of the timing marks weren't where they were supposed to be. I think it is right, but just in case............
WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO STOP A CS IN A RUNAWAY SITUATION????
Possibilities being considered:-
1 Use the exhaust valve lifter. (Can this be done?) 2 Half open the compression changeover. (Will this stop the engine?) 3 Loosen the injector pipe (Can I find the spanner without panicking?)
I really don't want to put my foot in the flywheel :)
Alan
PS. See how optimistic I can be...I actually believe it might just fire up :)
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If you think it is going to run away then better not start it in the first place.
The exhaust valve lifter is probably the best thing initially, then get the injector pipe off while it is running down, as sufficient fuel in the chamber may cause problems if the revs are high enough and fuel is still coming in at full throttle.
Did you check the assembly against the pictures on our (home) website?
Peter -- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Luton, UK snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk http://www.prepair.co.uk
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On Fri, 08 Sep 2006 11:10:34 +0100, Prepair Ltd wrote:

He he, and only give it the minimum amout of fuel your can get away with. Mind I surprised how long an ancient and worn out (sadly) Honda ran on just it's float chamber of fuel the other day.
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On Fri, 08 Sep 2006 11:10:34 +0100, Prepair Ltd

Thanks Peter,
I can't find the assy pics on your website, but I have checked against the CAV manual. I think it is OK, but the timing marks on the rack and pinion seem a little different from the ones shown.
I will rotate the engine by hand a few times first and see that the pump doesn't pump in the stop position before I give it a go.
Regards
Alan
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There are two sets of stuff available, the better set for assembly is in the Articles section, look under 'Miscellaneous' or go straight to it:
http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel/Articles/diesel1.htm
Peter -- Peter A Forbes Prepair Ltd, Luton, UK snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk http://www.prepair.co.uk
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On Fri, 08 Sep 2006 13:01:18 +0100, Prepair Ltd

Yep, that's the way I did it except my rack has two dots which I presume just show each side of the body when it is in the right position.
Many thanks
Alan
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Prepair Ltd wrote:

=====Good advice, Peter. I remember vividly a GM diesel which ran away, when disaster was averted by my quick-thinking apprentice who immediately covered the air-intake with his felt hat.
It nearly got sucked in, but luckily it was a proper felt Akubra and not one of those useless baseball caps (which by the way, I hate - I have had enough sun-cancers burnt off or cut out of the back of my neck, ears and surrounding territory).
JW =====
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Shutting off the fuel supply on a runaway engine will not stop it if the engine is worn and drawing engine oil past the piston rings into the combustion chamber. What will happen in this case if the engine is not stopped, will be that it will continue to run until it has no more oil, and then destroys itself!
Sure way to stop it is to plug the air intake, with something like a cricket ball, or discharge a CO2 extinguisher into the intake. Seems very peculiar that no one using this forum knew that information!
k

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Not peculiar at all, not many people keep cricket balls or CO2 extinguishers handy, either at their place of work or in their home workshop.
If you had the standard Lister air intake with its ring of holes on about a 4" PCD then you would have a job covering it with your hand. You certainly wouldn't have time to find a spanner and take it off or unscrew it from the inlet stub.
As far as drawing oil up past the piston; while that is a possibility it is unlikely that the engine would start in the first place if it was that worn. The possibility does exist however, and it is fairly well documented.
The advice given was appropriate to the question asked.
Peter -- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk Web: http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel
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Thing is the advice given just wouldnt work in certain circumstances, so perhaps it would be better to bear this in mind, and post information that would cover all possible permutations? k
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Ken:
You KNOW that you cannot cover all possible permutations, don't worry the thing to death.
Peter -- Peter & Rita Forbes Email: snipped-for-privacy@easynet.co.uk Web: http://www.oldengine.org/members/diesel
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Just dont feel its that helpful to post advice, which in some circumstances wouldnt be of the slightest use, when there are alternatives that would work..............
k
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This method was mentioned in an earlier thread. I will have a suitable ball handy just in case, but as the only extinguisher I have is a powder type I think I will give that a miss :)
Alan
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Wouldn't a tennis ball seal better? ;o))
Seriously though, a towel soaked in water would be easy to find & handy to wrap around the inlet of almost anything - easier to find in an average workshop than a cricket ball or a fire extinguisher, I suspect.
"But" said a small voice "Some of the water would get sucked in & dampen the fire whilst improving the octane rating - wouldn't that make it run even faster?"
Shut up, voice ............
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Time flies like an arrow Fruit flies like a banana
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Kim Siddorn wrote:

I once saw a large rag placed over the air intake to stop a run-away Ford Four cylinder diesel engined Atlas Copco compressor, while it had the desired result and stopped the engine. The only problem is that substantial pieces of rag ended up in the cylinders and if I recall correctly all the inlet valves needed replacing. I doubt that the Lister would produce the same level of suction, but to be on the safe side I suspect that a cricket ball would be a better bet than a tennis ball.
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Richard H Huelin wrote:

But how many of us could bowl a cricket ball right into the air inlet while peeping around the doorway?
JW
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LOL! Very true - but I couldn't guarantee to serve a tennis ball into the inlet either.
I could certainly get an arrow in there first pop, but that ain't going to help much I suspect.
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Time flies like an arrow Fruit flies like a banana

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Kim Siddorn wrote:

Tennis balls will cheerfully suck themselves inside out and disappear up the pipe. A conical wooden bung is the thing, on a chain to make sure it can't be dropped or lost.
(At Cummins we had such a thing)
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