Oily Spark Plug

Kim, The rings are not damaged and are free to rotate - I will take your advice and leave them to start with a replace the gasket only.
Regards, Ian.

Roland's
are
bacon
over
the
the
them
out
the
a
rings.
at
top
asbestos,
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Unlikely as the problem has only developed since the valve grind, but, while you've got it in bits, check that the baffle in the bottom of the crank case is correct. It is different for standard and reverse rotation engines (or maybe the same part fitted the other way round) and if not right will lead to too much oil being splashed up the bore.
Also check fit of inlet valve in guide, expect a bit of slop, but if it is very worn then there is a possibility of exessive oil running down and being sucked into the engine (did you clean any baked on muck off of the valve stem when you did the regrind?).
--
NHH



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Nick, I don't know what this baffle is you are referring to? Will check the inlet valve as you suggest. Yes I did get all the muck off the valve before I put it back. The more I think of it the more I think I topped up with the wrong oil and overfilled the engine. This caused oil to pass up through the push rods and into the valve gear which then entered the chamber. Many thanks, Ian.

while
case
being
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Curved piece of sheet steel with a slot in the middle through which the big end dipper passes to pick up oil from the bottom of the case
--
NHH


"kingsnavy" wrote (snip):-
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Nick, I know what you mean. I don't recall seeing this so I will check. Thanks, Ian.

big
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"

asbestos,
Each to his own Kim but it works for me, I just forgot to mention to allow it to cool slowly.
Martin P

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Sorry about this, but every time I hear it, I just can't help myself -
It's the heating that anneals copper - whether dropped into water or allowed to cool slowly makes no diff. to final hardness (softness).
Dropping it water however will flake away an oxide film, clean it up a bit & save waiting for it to cool down. So I do it, too.
Pavlov JW Norton AntiVirus 2003 installed ************************************

sorry
in
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Kim said <snip>
You would need to heat it to red heat and drop it in cold water to anneal it

Jack Watson said <snip> It's the heating that anneals copper - whether dropped into water or allowed to cool slowly makes no diff. to final hardness (softness).

Absolutely. It was my poor sentence construction that caught me out, not my knowledge ;o))
Whilst we are at it, I'd always understood that dull red was required to anneal copper. Would you agree? Martin Perman suggests that a lower temperature - as might be achieved with a domestic oven - is sufficient and I don't have a figure.
Any ideas anyone?
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
I'd rather have a free bottle in front of me than a free frontal lobotomy!

it
allow
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On Wed, 12 Nov 2003 12:43:13 -0000, "J K Siddorn"

Far too hot. Just enough to see an oxide colour forming is enough.
You not only need to get it hot, but you need to keep it hot for a short time. It's only a short time, but it does need to sit for a moment, not just be flashed and then quenched.
Steel is a matter of dissolving carbon in iron and moving it between phases. Copper is much simpler, as it doesn't change between phases. Annealing copper is just a matter of crystallography - work hardening it creates dislocations ("jerks" in the crystal lattice) and annealing it allows these dislocations to be re-absorbed as the crystal lattice regularises itself.
Generally it's the carbon-containing alloys that have complex phase behaviour, and non-alloyed pure elements have simple behaviour - but titanium contradicts both.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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Andy Dingley said <snip>
Far too hot. Just enough to see an oxide colour forming is enough.
You not only need to get it hot, but you need to keep it hot for a short time. It's only a short time, but it does need to sit for a moment, not just be flashed and then quenched.

Really? Martin's right then - sorry, Martin ;o))
So - what are we talking about then? 200c?
Rubbing soap on the surface of aluminium before heating is a good indicator. Dark brown indicates that its hot enough.
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
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Kim, As I said before each to his own :-))
Martin

indicator.
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For info I replaced piston rings and head gasket. It has never sounded better, know mis-firing, perfect sound. A little blue smoke in the exhaust but that's about all. Even found a 7COM champion spark plug but there was too much blue smoke in the exhaust so I changed this plug to a NKG A-6.
Many thanks, Ian.

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Nice to know that this august assemblage can help sometimes. regards Roland

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