Re: Any ideas?

Has anyone any idea what this is?
>It is made of steel, is tapered from the handle end to the point. The holes
>are threaded and reducing sizes towards the point. There is the name
>"STUBS" at the handle end but no other identifying marks.
>It came from a box of "junk" that my uncle was sorting out before throwing
>it out. He doesn't even know where it came from!
I had/have something very similar, inherited from my grandfather, but
so far as I remember each threaded hole had a smaller intersecting
hole on either side, to give two cutting edges,, it was a 'die plate'
for cutting small threads. Yours could be a thread gauge, but then I
would expect the holes to be marked in some way, or maybe it's
intended for 'rolling' threads?
I was surprised that your attachment got through, they are usually
blocked.
Cheers
Tim
Dutton Dry-Dock
Traditional & Modern canal craft repairs
Vintage diesel engine service
Reply to
Tim Leech
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A Screw Plate. are you sure all the holes are threaded. It looks like one that had plain holes for each size to gauge with.
Tom
Reply to
Tom
any pictures ?
Martin P
Tim Leech wrote:
Reply to
Campingstoveman
I have no real idea but it looks similar to a device I use for 'bluing' screws or screw heads.
Mark
Reply to
Mark_Howard
In a 1958 copy of the Buck & Hickman tool catalogue there is a picture of something similar but without the handle. It is 'Roebuck' Combination gauge. However it has three rows of holes, the centre row of holes are B.A. (0 to 10) Standard sizes, the left side is the drill size for tapping and the right side is for testing diameter and thread finished work.
Could the one pictured be a basic/cheap GO/NOGO type of thread gauge?
Andy M
milestones snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com
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Reply to
andyengine
Thanks for the ideas. I cannot identify all the threads but the smallest one is 6BA, there is also a 4BA but I cannot fit any of the others. If it's a thread gauge I don't know how the individual threads can be identified as there are no markings. There are no cutting edges so I don't think it can be used as a die plate.
Reply to
Fred
Thanks to everyone who replied. I also asked the Science Museum, here is their reply This is the reply I got from the Science Museum; Thank you for your enquiry, which has been passed to me by a colleague.
We have a number of these items in our Hand and Machine Tools collection, which look very similar to yours. It is (or rather, was) a screw-plate, for cutting threads. Perhaps it was converted for measuring different gauges of metal rod, which would account for the lack of a cutting thread on the circumferences of the different-sized holes. I doubt it would have been a thread gauge.
I hope that answers your question.
Regards,
Ben Russell Curator, Mechanical Engineering Science Museum Exhibition Road London
Reply to
Fred
I've got to say I'm surprised at the Science Museum's dearth of knowledge on the subject. BTW, You never got back to me on my query, Fred. I found quite a few in some of my old catalogs and the common descriptive term was "Lancashire Screw Plate." Later versions have two swarf breaking holes interrupting the die thread. A Google search of "Stubs screw plate" brings up an interesting page at the Davistown Museum site:
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A firm that started in 1777 and still in business today.
Tom
Reply to
Tom
Big Snip
Hi Tom, Still going but not owned by Stubs anymore. I retired as a telephone engineer 9 years ago & throughout my 40 year career I watched the slow decline in Stubs products from the early years in Scotland Road to the years in Wilderspool Causeway. The sadest part was when they stopped making Stubs famous files. In 1957 when I first visited they still had a few skilled hand file cutters. The later years were all machine cut but still very good quality. The current remnant is shown at
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(mainly ground silver steel) Now owned by the Ascot Group.
Reply to
Dave Croft
There's nothing more annoying reading a discussion about something you cant see because there are no pictures, what are you lot looking at?
Martin P
Tim Leech wrote:
Reply to
Campingstoveman
Martin, big brother must have deleted the image.:-) Copy here:
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Top one is Fred's Bottom one is a later version with chip breakers. The two holes for each size allowed two step thread cutting.
Tom
Reply to
Tom
AH! Thanks Tom.
Colloquially known as "cake slice" taps, they were used extensively by clock and watch makers. It may well be 100 years old or more.
I've got a couple of them and in this form they are mainly used for cleaning up screw threads. The one in the catalogue is more commonly used for screw making, naturally.
AFAIK, they were the first attempt at a standard thread form.
Regards,
Kim Siddorn
Reply to
Kim Siddorn
that would be a die, not a tap.
you can only cut a male thread with those things
Reply to
Guy Fawkes

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