Silicone Gaskets (was Allen Scythe Info)

Thanks Kim,
Very useful. I am still, slowly, rebuilding my 'unknown' (presumed Norman?)
engine that was acquired completely sans gaskets. I made some brown paper
gaskets for the crankcase and now I know what to do with them!
One of the absolute joys of this little engine is setting the valve timing
(anyone who's tried it on a D1 will undoubtedly know what I mean!). I have
no timing figures available so I have guesstimated the cam position based on
other engines. The difficulty is that to adjust it requires the removal of
the magneto, the oil, and one of the crankcase covers and there is no
positive adjustment as you might have with a geared system where you may
move the cam one tooth at a time. This, coupled with the fact that locating
the cam followers on the cam is a distinctly hit and miss affair mean that
the chances of the engine ever running correctly are slim to none!
I know the winter months in this country seem to be interminable but with
four engine rebuilds, two trolley builds, one engine to build from scratch
(a Jaegar Economy half scale), a bathroom refit, an Alfa Romeo engine
rebuild and a Jaguar semi-restoration to do I think I may need a thirty-six
month winter!
You don't have any other useful tips do you? (Like how to get out of a
bathroom refit without spending engine/car/workshop money on a 'man what
does'!).
Mark
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mark.howard10
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Mark,
That's the ex ebay water cooled single right? I was thinking about the engine only the other day while writing to SEM on another matter - someone really should distil the discussion on this NG which led to the tentative Norman experimental/prototype ID and send to SEM in response to the ID&ASST piece. I still believe that is the only way to ensure such information is 'on the record' and will remain available to enthusiasts in the future. I don't mind doing it myself, but as I am neither owner nor original identifier, I am reluctant to do so.
Reply to
Nick H
wrote (snip):-
Don't know where you are, but if you want a really good look at Norman D, there is one on a Bungalight (sp?) set in Stamford (Lincs) museum, presumably aquired from Newage which took over Arthur Lyons.
And the carb IIRC
Good oh, save me a job ;-)
Reply to
Nick H
Nick,
You have a very valid point there which I really should have thought of myself.
The more I look at the Norman D, the more I am convinced that it is a water-cooled version of the same, or at least a water-cooled derivative or forerunner.
Whilst the crankcase and cylinder are obviously different, the cam cover, mag mount, flywheel and governor arrangement are as best I can tell identical. Even the magneto appears to be remarkably similar.
I'll write something up for SEM. I just thought about bundling the whole ID process up with a brief restoration article but the rebuild progress is so slow at the moment any article might be limited to a 'how to pull it to bits and leave it cluttering the bench' description :).
Regards
Mark
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Reply to
mark.howard10
Don't know where you are, but if you want a really good look at Norman D, there is one on a Bungalight (sp?) set in Stamford (Lincs) museum, presumably aquired from Newage which took over Arthur Lyons.
Or you could look here :-)
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Regards
Philip T-E
Reply to
philipte
Hi Philip,
I can't seem to get this link to work, is there a secret I don't know about?
Mark
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Reply to
mark.howard10
Hmm, you're right, it doesn't do much does it!
If you go to my Webshots page (User name Hotbulb) You'll find the pics in the 'Smaller Events' album. It is there....honest :-)
Regards
Philip T-E
Reply to
ClaraNET
Ah thank you, all has become clear!
As I understand it, Norman started business in 1919 with their air-cooled engine used in the Kenilworth bike. This unit became the D with a reshaped crankcase and a fan to aid cooling when used as a stationary engine. Does anyone know whether the D / Bungalyte suffered from overheating and therefore requiring a water-cooled version to be born?
I'm trying to place mine in the running order of things. Maybe they simply offered a water-cooled version of the D as an alternative for continuous operation - it evidently seems to have been quite unpopular - maybe, if I ever get mine rebuilt, I will find out why! The dates I've managed to piece together for mine (early '20's) puts it roughly in the middle of D production, but then my dates are a rough estimate based on the Vici carburetor and the Fellows magneto, neither of which seemed to be around much after 1927 (about the same time as the D ceased production).
Any fragments of information are most welcome.
Mark
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