Airbrushes

I've decided to take the plunge and buy an airbrush, but
thought I'd ask around and see if anyone has any
recommendations or otherwise. I'm after a double-action
airbrush (sounds like the better option from what I've
heard) and compressor.
I'm looking for something of good quality yet affordable
(ok, that's fairly subjective!).
There are a couple of airbrush and compressor packages that
I've seen advertised in the model magazines from Expo Tools
- one for £99.95 and another for £179. Does anyone know
anything about these? Better still, anyone own one or used one?
I've also heard that Badger are good - any recommendations
for particular models??
Any help would be much appreciated.
Matt
Reply to
Matt Ots
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I've got several, but usually go back to the old Humbrol one that has given good service for 20-odd years. Several sizes of jar supplied with prescription medicines also fit it.
Reply to
Tim Christian
In message , Matt Ots writes
Have a look at the Machine Mart web site. They have a large selection of airbrushes and compressors to choose from.
Reply to
Mike Hughes
I've been using airbrushes for 40 years or more and, since you asked, my opinion is that for model railroading, you can't beat the Paasche model H. It is a single-action brush that is inexpensive, easy to use and clean - that "easy to clean" bit is important- and comes with a complete line of accessories and manufacturer support. You can do anything from a Brighton Works Terrier to a Duchess class with the control it has available.
I don't know right off where you can purchase one in the UK, but if it has to come in the post, then it doesn't matter if it's from Glasgow or Southampton or New York.
Perhaps John Turner has them for sale, or, if not you can get one from Dixie Art supply in the US. Takes about a fortnight to get there from here.
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This one is all about the model H
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I have a drawer full of airbrushes that I have acquired through the years. Most of them are seldom-used account I always grab my model H first for 99.999% of all the painting I do. Compared to what you can pay for an inferior brush, the Model H is a real bargain at £19.26 or EU$27.63 (US$33.95)
Reply to
66class
If you're planning to spray (thinned) enamels, I would suggest a gravity fed airbrush. I recently bought a professional air brush and a compressor from
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cost incl VAT and postage £86 quid. Have a look at their web site. The a/brush is made by Sealey and I bought the Draper diaphagm compressor for £58 IMHO the more expensive art-room brushes simply aren't up to the job.
Reply to
jasper_goat
Matt Ots said the following on 30/01/2006 21:08:
What is "affordable" is pretty subjective, but I use a Badger 150. This is a lovely airbrush, and a massive improvement over the £20 jobbie I was using before. It's very controllable, and easy to keep clean. Forget the propellant cans - they're crap - I use a cheapie compressor from Machine Mart, with a Badger water filter in the airbrush line. You MUST use braided hose when using a compressor, and this hose also seems do damp out the pulses of air (I don't have an air reservoir, but one would be nice.)
The airbrush and any spares/accessories are available from Mainly Trains, although I'm sure there's plenty of others.
Thinking about it, Machine Mart sell what looks like a Badger 150 clone, although their website won't help you find it! I have no idea what this is like, but clones are getting pretty good these days, so it might be worth a look.
Reply to
Paul Boyd
Try
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I've had one of these for about 4 years. It is more than suitable for my limited skill. I run it off my 1.5hp DIY compresser which has a reservoir.
Reply to
Eddie Bray
Eddie Bray said the following on 31/01/2006 09:03:
Yep - that's the one. Bl**dy hell - I've just seen the price compared to the Badger!
Reply to
Paul Boyd
Right, cut to the chase! You need a Badger 200 airbrush with a gravity cup for when using thinned enamels. Buy the Kit fir around £50 and you will get the brush, some storage jars, a hose attachment and a starter can of propellant. This 'can' stuff is pretty crap but will get you started. Put the propellant can into a bowl of warm water whilst in use to help keep the pressur at a useable level. A small Micon or similar compressor will greatly enhance your pleasure in using the brush. The gravity cup is only a couple of quid extra and is great for fine detailing.
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at set 200-2 or 200-3
Reply to
Nick Beard
" A small Micon or similar compressor will
You can also use a spare car wheel (if you can persuade the female of the species that you allowed to bring it into the house). Car valve adapters are about £4 or £5.
Fill the tyre to about 40psi it will last you ages.
Reply to
Eddie Bray
I can recomend airbrushes.com I ordered some jars and a new gravity feed cup from them and they came the next day which was great.
I use a Badger 155 Anthem dual action airbrush, it was fairly expensive but is very good and I get really good results with acrylic paints. Anyone else use one of these ? How do you find the control of the spraying air, it all seems a bit all or nothing to me ?
Chris
Reply to
Chris Packman
My comment was restricted to the airbrush. Compressors are another matter. However, at £20 for the brush, which is a very good one, you have lots of money left over for a good compressor. Can you use 115v in the UK? I can do it here by using only one leg of a 230v receptacle and running the other to neutral or earth. We use 60Hz, but most things are designed these days to operate on 50/60Hz.
Reply to
66class
snipped-for-privacy@noisp.com said the following on 31/01/2006 14:48:
I assume by "here" you mean USA, not UK. For anyone in the UK reading this, you DON'T get 115V in the way described, and in any case you most certainly MUST NOT ever run any "leg" to earth. At the very least, you will get breakers tripping, at the worst you will die.
Reply to
Paul Boyd
"Eddie Bray" wrote
Been there, done that, the tee shirt has been washed so many times its faded!
Car tyres are not a touch on a proper compressor.
Elliott (Badger 200, gravity fed cup, Micom compressor + badger moisture trap)
Reply to
Elliott Cowton
I agree Elliot, but if you only want to do a little airbrushing initially, and you have a spare in the boot then its probably better than the cans of air.
I use a 1.5hp compressor with a decent sized reservoir, the compresor runs and fills the reservoir up on startup and the compressor has never had to fill it up again before I am done. Have not had a water filter before, ordered one today complete with a regulator, so I will see how that works at the weekend. I am almost ready to start weathering all my crappy show bought 2nd hand wagons for practice before I make a start on my new Bachmann Wagons and Locos.
Eddie.
Reply to
Eddie Bray
Thanks for all the suggestions so far (keep them coming!).
What are the advantages/disadvantages of single action as opposed to dual action? Some people seem to favour one over the other. Is it simply a matter of personal preference or is there a particular reason for going for one over the other??
Matt
Reply to
Matt Ots

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