Blue Pullman - again!

Can anyone state categorically (ideally backed up by photographic reference)
whether the original Blue Pullman train (either Midland or Western version)
carried small yellow warning panels please.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
Loading thread data ...
I have looked at the pictures on Google (of the real thing) and of the 8 or so photos cannot see any yellow warning panels.
Reagrds
Peter A
Reply to
Sailor
People didn't need any visual warning of approaching trains in those days.
The station announcer would come on the Tannoy and say, "Would passengers standing on Platform 3 please stand well back from the edge as the Birmingham express passes through."
20 seconds later, the train would whizz through - on Platform 2.
Anyone remember the performer who could simulate all this with his voice and a special microphone?
Reply to
MartinS
Perhaps you're thinking of Reginald Gardiner.
formatting link
Which I remember from my childhood.
Stuart
Reply to
stuart
Have had a quick look through Keith Robertson's book "Blue Pullman" (but not the supplement, which I don't have) and all photogrpahs show the ends to be either blue with the Pullman crest (as originally introduced) or all over yellow; I cannot recall ever seeing a photograph of any with the small warning panels. I accept this doesn't mean that small panels were never carried and - as ever - am content to be proved wrong.
David Costigan
Reply to
David Costigan
No, it wasn't him, although I do remember this record. Uncle Mac used to play it on Children's Favourites, along with The Laughing Policeman and that song about Christopher Robin and Alice visiting Buckingham Palace.
Reply to
MartinS
You're showing your age.
Derek MacCulloch - Uncle Mac.
I was on Regional Round when I was a kid, and this included being shown round Broadcasting House. It was Uncle Mac's program, he was the question master and we were introduced to him.
I liked Reginald Gardener, but couldn't stand the Laughing policeman. "Christopher Robin went down with Alice" sounded like a disease.
Reply to
Christopher A. Lee
"Chris" wrote
They were introduced in 1963 also to warn pedestrians at level crossings (those without barriers, I assume) of the approach of what were very dark coloured trains.
John.
Reply to
John Turner
Not sure what you are getting at. It is strange that LT don't have yellow ends or for that matter a lot of other railways around the world. I did hear that yellow ends were added so that if the headlights failed the train could still run in service, daylight obviously, rather than the train being failed. Headlights are much better for track workers to see approaching trains than yellow ends.
Reply to
Chris
Steam trains didn't have either, and the driver's forward vision was often obstructed, but they were generally noisier, slower and more conspicuous from a distance with their smoke and steam.
Reply to
MartinS
In steam days the people working on the track had a lookout who would blow a horn to warn of an approaching train. There were also temporary speed restriction signs well in advance which the train crew had been notified of.
Reply to
Christopher A. Lee
- which would prevent them seeing or hearing approaching trains as well?
So, are you saying that in steam days there was no need for headlights or yellow panels to give visual approach warning because track gang working practices were safer?
Reply to
MartinS
"Christopher A. Lee" wrote
Could have been worse he could have gone down 'on' Alice.
Alice, Alice, who the flippin'-heck is Alice?
Sorry.
John.
Reply to
John Turner

Site Timeline

PolyTech Forum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.