Bulk Soda Ash wagons question

Hi again,
Having seen the Bulk Soda Ash train on Garry Brookes' excellent
website, I now have a burning desire to model some of those wagons.
What can I say - I have wagonitis. Does anyone have any additional info
or pics please? I'd like to know where they ran _from_, and what they
were rebuilt from.
If you don't know what I'm on about / would like to see the pictures,
visit
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and scroll halfway down
the main page.
A side note from me: it's a bit depressing to see the sheer amount of
traffic that used to ply back and forth every day. Much of it was just
"on my doorstep". You can *walk* along the former Carrington line now,
where these wagons used to end up. That's progress.
TIA...
Reply to
Jim M
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If you're interested in wagons have a look at
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There is a picture of one of these wagons there. These were used for conveyance of powdered chemicals, many being allocated for Soad Ash traffic, although later on it seems that some where used for sugar traffic - I can certainly remember seeing them in the yards at Cantley and Bury St. Edmunds. Both fitted and non-fitted examples existed. They weren't rebuilds but were built new in the early fifties.
As to where they ran from/to, I don't know but I dare say that somebody will know. I always liked these wagons, but as far as I know there are no models.
Stu
Reply to
Stu
Just found a book I was looking for - apparently some of these wagons, which are known as 'Covhops' (Covered Hoppers), were used for conveyance of sand by BIS for Rockware Glass. Once again, I don't know the routes.
Stu
Reply to
Stu
Well, isn't that strange!
I was going to post up a question on these very wagons this evening before I saw Jim's post (and visited the website quoted). I was going to ask what brakes they had, as I wanted to marshal them correctly - now I know - they're POO :-) potter55(at)ntlworld.com
If you don't know what I'm on about / would like to see the pictures,
Reply to
Dave Potter
Think we're getting a bit mixed up here - covhops (CGO CGP CGV) - which you would have seen at Bury St Eds - were generally used for grain (at least in East Anglia). I don't think the POO's as Jim mentions would have gotten within tens of miles of EA. And BTW, Jim's POO were made by Mainline, I have but one example.
HTH Dave
Reply to
Dave Potter
Dave is correct, I'm refering to the POO's, not the Covhops. As it happens I also e-mailed Paul Bartlett about them, and he's not sure either but he's going to get back to me!
I should also mention that these will be N gauge, eventually.
Reply to
Jim M
Hi all, from info I have there were two batches of wagons for this flow of soda ash from Northwich.
The first batch of 120 wagons were converted from BR 16t mineral wagons by ICI Mond between 12/69 and 12/70. These are to BR design 6/500. The ex Ministry wagons were also included in this batch. These were ICI Nos. 652 - 801. PO nos. unclear 5652-5801 ??
The second design listed in the BR diagram book is 6/501 and comprises 100 16t mineral wagons originally built by BR Shildon and Derby works. PO numbers POO CCC 5500-5599; ICIM Nos. 900-999. These were modified by C.C. Crump between 11/71 and 3/72 and incorporate a sheet support rail. These were hired to ICI Mond Division.
Some wagons appear to have had the side doors removed and plated over and the service finished in 1979.
Hope this info helps. If you want to have a copy of the basic BR diagram, let me know off-list.
I have managed to collect a good quantity of the Mainline OO rtr models of these wagons to complement my rakes of ICIM PHV bogie limestone hoppers.
Cheers Paul Harrison -- Pauls Wagon Pages
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Publications Homepage
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Reply to
Paul Harrison
Certainly does, thanks a lot!
What you are saying is practically the same as Paul Bartlett's info so the long and short of it is that I'll be using Peco 9' iron ore tipplers to represent the basic wagons.
Thanks again for the info.
Reply to
Jim M
You can take a horizontal section through the centre of the wheel, use this to gauge the length (the wheel is close enough to three feet long) then rotate it 90 degrees and you can get a fair idea of the height. Modelling these should be dead easy, especially as they are covered, and Cambridge Custom Transfers might provide the markings if you ask them nicely and send them some money. Looks like it has an end door. Any idea when they were introduced?
Reply to
Mike
Mmm. Looking forward to a whole train load of POOs.
Reply to
Tessy
Hmm thanks, I never thought of that. Good tip!
I believe "that man" Paul Harrison has already answered that one. In case you missed it;
HTH. :o)
Reply to
Jim M
I was looking at the picture two up from that one which shows a train of covhops - I didn't scroll down that far!
Stu :-)
Reply to
Stu

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